Franchise Opportunities in Austin, TX

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Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in Austin, TX will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

Assistance-with-state-licensing

Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News in Austin, TX

Residents at Austin's Northshore Apartments dealing with two-week power outage

Hundreds of residents of the Northshore Apartments in downtown Austin have been without power in their units for two weeks, but the company that operates the building said it expected power should be back on for the top floors at some point on Friday.The complex lost power the evening of April 28 after an electrical pull box and about 80 lines of conduit fell from the ceiling in a loading and service entry garage below the main parking area, according to Rachel Yeager of the city of Austin's code enforcement department....

Hundreds of residents of the Northshore Apartments in downtown Austin have been without power in their units for two weeks, but the company that operates the building said it expected power should be back on for the top floors at some point on Friday.

The complex lost power the evening of April 28 after an electrical pull box and about 80 lines of conduit fell from the ceiling in a loading and service entry garage below the main parking area, according to Rachel Yeager of the city of Austin's code enforcement department.

The fallen material damaged a vehicle that belonged to a diner who was eating at ATX Cocina, which is located in the building.

Northshore is operated by Greystar, a global rental company with dozens of apartment complexes in Austin. The property management company said it plans an investigation to determine why the outages happened so it can take precautions to make sure it doesn't happen again.

The plan is to turn the power back on in three phases starting on the top floor of the building and going down to around the 23rd floor. There is no specific timeline for when phases two and three will be carried out.

"We have to work with the city who has to power up each grid and communicate with our repair team before we can turn the power back on to each phase," the management team said in a statement to the American-Statesman.

The Northshore property was issued a notice of violation by city code enforcement on April 29, which gave the management company 48 hours to submit an action plan to repair the damaged electrical system. The plan requires a timeline for the repairs and information on how the apartment managers will provide tenants with temporary services. The notice of violation also notes that the property does not have adequate hot water and required the complex managers to find a way to provide hot water for tenants within two days.

Yeager said code enforcement investigators did not observe any structural damage to the concrete ceiling or parking surface on site.

The notice gives the apartment complex 30 days to obtain permits and repair the damage to the electrical system. The Statesman has filed an open records request with the city for a copy of the action plan.

Apartments in Northshore do not come cheap, with a one-bedroom apartment listed online for $2,752 a month and a two-bedroom for almost $5,000 a month. The building has an appraised market value of $307 million, according to the Travis Central Appraisal District.

Because of high temperatures in Austin over the past two weeks, property management recommended residents temporarily relocate, according to a written statement. Residents were offered a daily hotel and food stipend and will receive a rent abatement for May.

The management company said most residents have temporarily relocated to alternative housing. Electricity remains connected to common areas of the property, retail tenants and emergency systems, the statement said.

This case is ongoing with the city's code enforcement department, and Yeager said follow-up inspections will be conducted until all issues are resolved and brought back into compliance.

The apartment complex has had electrical crews working to restore power, according to the apartment management team. The property management office said no injuries have been reported, and Austin Fire Department and emergency response crews were immediately deployed to assess the situation.

Austin Energy spokesperson Matt Mitchell said staffers from the utility were on-site in April to disconnect the city’s side of the power supply so the apartment complex could arrange for repairs.

“Austin Energy is not involved in actual repairs like this on private property, but we do offer consultation when requested. The company itself is responsible for making the repairs, going through the permitting and inspection process with the City,” Mitchell wrote in an email. “Once the property goes through the permitting and inspection process with the City, Austin Energy comes back out to inspect and ensure everything is set for the power to be reconnected. Once that is confirmed, we reconnect power to energize that property.”

Mitchell said Austin Energy is available to consult with commercial and residential customers about repairs. He said in this case the property management company declined a consultation, which he said is not unusual.

Chipmaker NXP considers Austin for $2.6 billion expansion, up to 800 new jobs

In a move that could add even more fuel to the booming Central Texas high-tech sector, chipmaker NXP Semiconductors is considering a $2.6 billion expansion in Austin that would create up to 800 jobs.The potential expansion is the latest big project for which the Austin area is in the running. Tech firm Applied Materials said in March that it's considering Hutto for a $2.4 billion research and development center, while chipmaker Infineon Technologies said in February that it's considering Austin for a $700 million expansion.NXP ...

In a move that could add even more fuel to the booming Central Texas high-tech sector, chipmaker NXP Semiconductors is considering a $2.6 billion expansion in Austin that would create up to 800 jobs.

The potential expansion is the latest big project for which the Austin area is in the running. Tech firm Applied Materials said in March that it's considering Hutto for a $2.4 billion research and development center, while chipmaker Infineon Technologies said in February that it's considering Austin for a $700 million expansion.

NXP Semiconductors, which is based in the Netherlands and has two fabrication plants in Austin, is seeking tax breaks from the Austin Independent School District under the state's Chapter 313 incentive program for proposed expansion. An initial presentation to the district's board Tuesday night didn't specify the amount, but previous incentives agreements from Texas school districts for similar Chapter 313 deals have been for tens of millions of dollars.

Both Infineon and Applied Materials also are seeking tax breaks for their projects under Chapter 313. The potential incentive deal that Infineon has applied for from the Del Valle school district is valued at about $8.9 million over 10 years, assuming no change in the district's tax rate over that time. The amount of incentives Applied Materials is seeking from the Hutto school district isn't available yet.

The Chapter 313 incentives program — which is named after a portion of the tax code — has been controversial. It's set to expire at the end of this year because state lawmakers declined to renew it during last year's legislative session, although deals struck before then won't be affected.

The Texas comptroller's office has advised that Chapter 313 applications should be submitted by June 1, because the process of evaluating and finalizing them can take up to six months. That has set up something of a rush by companies seeking to submit applications.

"Certainly, (companies) want to get their applications in and all their paperwork in before June," said Matt Patton, an economist with Austin-based Angelou Economics. “You want to be able to take advantage of every opportunity you can.”

Representatives of Kroll, a site-selection firm working for NXP, told Austin school board members Tuesday that the NXP expansion won't take place here without local incentives, because they're needed to qualify for additional funds from the federal CHIPS for America Act.

The CHIPS act, which will provide more than $50 billion in federal funding to the semiconductor industry throughout the U.S. to offset the cost of construction for manufacturing facilities, hasn't won final approval. But it has bipartisan support, and versions of it have passed both the House and Senate.

NXP is considering other locations for the project, Kroll representatives said, but they didn't specify where. A final decision on the location is expected to be made this year, with a goal of construction starting in 2024 and the facility being operational by late 2026.

The company also intends to seek incentives from the city of Austin and from Travis County, they said.

Travis County spokesman Hector Nieto said the county hasn't been contacted by NXP yet. The city's economic development department declined to comment.

NXP's representatives said jobs created by the company's potential expansion here would pay an average annual salary of more than $100,000.

NXP, which had revenue of $11 billion in 2021, has about 4,000 employees in Austin, where it has multiple facilities, including two chip fabrication plants. Globally, it has more than 29,000 employees.

The company's potential Austin expansion would add to what is becoming a critical mass of semiconductor firms in Central Texas. In addition to the potential expansions in the region by Infineon and Applied Materials, Samsung announced last year that it is building a $17 billion chip factory in Taylor.

"It's really exciting — people (in the chip industry) want to be close to where all the action is going," Patton said. “With the migration of firms expanding to Austin and Central Texas at large, it makes a lot of sense" from a supply-chain perspective for NXP to want to be a part of it.

Still, the potential Chapter 313 incentives from the Austin school district are drawing some opposition.

Under the Chapter 313 program, school districts are reimbursed by the state for the corporate tax breaks they agree to provide. That attribute has made Chapter 313 controversial among critics who say school districts have no reason not to grant them, and that the program siphons money from taxpayers statewide as handouts to corporations.

“There's no such thing as free money," said Doug Greco, lead organizer with Central Texas Interfaith, a group that opposes all Chapter 313 deals and has worked to help end the program.

“It's money that is being drained out of the state budget that could be going to schools," Greco said. "When you add these (deals) up, it's just a drain on the system that we can't sustain. Let's stop the gold rush here."

Central Texas Interfaith turned out for the meeting Tuesday to urge Austin school board members to seek feedback from the community before agreeing to any deal with NXP.

Michael Lateur, a managing director of Kroll, told the board that the potential deal would be a boon to the district by reducing the costs it incurs under a state program known as recapture, which is designed to support school districts that have less property wealth per student.

Austin school district leaders expect to send $846 million to the state under recapture during the 2022-23 academic year.

The Austin school board hasn't taken a vote on NXP's bid for tax breaks, although it could vote to move forward during a meeting May 19. Still, such a vote would merely begin a more formal process under which NXP would submit an application to the comptroller's office for evaluation and a deal could be negotiated.

“The trustees are going to have to kick the tires on this, but whatever you think about this kind of deal, there's no financial downside to the school district,” Austin school district spokesperson Jason Stanford said. “We would send less money to the state in recapture and keep more for our kids. We’d come out ahead.”

If NXP chooses Austin for the expansion, it would add to a recent string of economic development wins for the Austin metro area.

Samsung's next-generation chip fabrication plant in Taylor is expected to employ 1,800 people. Meanwhile, electric automaker Tesla announced late last year that it had moved its corporate headquarters to Austin, and in December it started production at its new $1.1 billion Travis County factory.

Both of those facilities received Chapter 313 incentives deals from Central Texas school districts.

Total lunar eclipse will be visible in Austin, San Antonio this weekend

AUSTIN, Texas - You're going to be able to see a total lunar eclipse this weekend in Central Texas. We have a good chance to see the show with skies staying mostly clear, according to ...

AUSTIN, Texas - You're going to be able to see a total lunar eclipse this weekend in Central Texas. We have a good chance to see the show with skies staying mostly clear, according to Zack Shields.

A total lunar eclipse takes place when the Earth comes between the Sun and the Moon and its shadow covers the Moon. Eclipse watchers can see the Moon turn red when the eclipse reaches totality. According to Space.com, the moon will enter the Earth’s shadow on the night of May 15 and into the early morning hours of May 16.

Most of the U.S. will have a full view of the phenomenon, according to TimeAndDate.com.

In Austin and San Antonio, the lunar eclipse will begin around 8:32 pm on Sunday, May 15, and end around 1:50 am on Monday, May 16. The eclipse will be at its maximum at 11:11 p.m. on Sunday, May 15. The total eclipse should be 5 hours and 19 minutes long.

It’s the first total lunar eclipse since May 2021, according to NASA.

The full moon in May is known as the Flower Moon, according to National Geographic, so this will be a total lunar eclipse of the Flower Moon.

The moon names are listed below for each month of the year:

January - Wolf Moon

February - Snow Moon

March - Worm Moon

April - Pink Moon

May - Flower Moon

June - Strawberry Moon

July - Buck Moon

August - Sturgeon Moon

September - Harvest Moon

October - Hunter’s Moon

November - Beaver Moon

December - Cold Moon

Poke Bay closing its doors after property was sold to UT Austin without warning

AUSTIN, Texas — A local small business near the University of Texas at Austin's campus is closing its doors after five years in business. UT purchased the plot of land on Guadalupe Stre...

AUSTIN, Texas — A local small business near the University of Texas at Austin's campus is closing its doors after five years in business. UT purchased the plot of land on Guadalupe Street to expand the school’s footprint. This move by the university now has business owners at Poke Bay scrambling to figure out what to do next.

The deal was finalized in December between UT and the property owner. Poke Bay found out after the fact from the property owner. The owners' daughter shared the family's emotional story on TikTok to bring attention to the issue.

“If you live in Austin or want to support a small business, please watch,” Angelica Song said in the TikTok video. “Unfortunately, UT Austin bought out the building that my parents are tenants at and are essentially just kind of kicking them out."

Song voiced her frustration over her parent’s Asian restaurant Poke Bay that's being pushed out for new development by UT Austin. Her parents, Paul Song and his wife opened the business five years ago.

“I believe UT is not obligated to do anything. It’s on paper, but it’s just that it’s unfortunate for me, me and my wife, and our family," Owner, Paul Song said.

In December, the former property owner locked down a deal to sell the land to UT ultimately forcing Poke Bay to close or consider relocation.

“It’s tough, it’s not easy but we were very fortunate enough to meet with good customers," Song said.

Last week, UT unveiled its 10-year strategic plan to be the most impactful public research university in the world with plans for expansion. A new campus building is expected to replace the businesses in the building on Guadalupe Street. Song said he would have liked to have been given options.

“If we had an option to stay, yeah sure, we would stay,” Song said. “At the same time looking at the other side of the coin, I understand where UT is coming from but it’s just tougher on us.”

Poke Bay was doing well before the pandemic hit and they’re slowly starting to bounce back to pre-pandemic levels with lines out the door. The owners did have plans to sell their location during the pandemic but those conversations stopped as developers stopped buying restaurants.

"We had potential buyers prior to the lockdown but obviously during the lockdown, there’s no traffic,” Song said.

Paul's daughter Angelica encouraged the community to go out and support the closing business one last time. A line quickly formed Tuesday with UT students sad to see the business go.

“I think it was sweet to hear how much the daughter like loved her parents and just wanted them to be supported," UT student, Grace Beasley said.

“It’s very sad. I just hope they’re able to be at a new building,” UT student, Maclane Masraff said.

Song said he and his wife are thankful for the years of support.

“Trying to be optimistic. Maybe God has something else for us,” he said.

Poke Bay's lease was set to expire this October, but the owners opted to terminate the lease earlier. As UT students will be heading home for the summer, Song said there was no point in staying open that long with only a few months of business after students got back to campus. At this time, there are no plans to relocate. The business is scheduled to close at the end of May.

UT Austin released a statement Wednesday regarding the property purchase:

As the university continues to find ways to serve our students, provide additional housing options, and advance our educational mission, we acknowledge the challenges created by our growth – especially combined with Austin’s growth. We appreciate the role local businesses have in our campus community, and we will engage them in conversations about other university options for relocation.

Austin provides list of resources amid national baby formula shortage

The Texas WIC is also offering formula options to help families in need.AUSTIN, Texas — As the nation is amid a shortage in baby formula due to a recall, Austin Public Health and Texas WIC...

The Texas WIC is also offering formula options to help families in need.

AUSTIN, Texas — As the nation is amid a shortage in baby formula due to a recall, Austin Public Health and Texas WIC are reminding the public about local resources that are still available to families in need.

According to Texas WIC, more than 80% of women enrolled in the program begin breastfeeding after giving birth.

“We want to help mothers with nourishment options,” said Annette Phinney, WIC director for Austin Public Health. “We are here to support with education so that parents can make the best and safest decision.”

Here's a list of information provided directly from Austin Public Health:

APH resources

WIC options

The Texas WIC is offering formula options to help families in need. Please note that these options are only available for WIC clients. You can register online to become a client.

WIC clients can go to TexasWIC.org to find the list of alternative brands that are available to them if they cannot find their brand at the grocery store. This list is updated daily. They can also contact their local WIC office for assistance.

HHS fact sheet

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has created a fact sheet to help families find formula.

Safety information

The current stock of Similac products on the shelf are safe, as these were all manufactured after the recall at a different manufacturing plant not affected by the recall.

If someone has purchased powdered baby or toddler formula with the brand names Similac, Alimentum or EleCare, the first thing they should do is check to see if their formula was affected here. Look at the bottom of the can or container and find the lot number and enter it into the website. If recalled, do not use it, and follow the manufacturer’s instructions to get a replacement. Abbott can be contacted at 1-800-986-8540.

Parents can contact their baby’s health care provider if their baby recently drank one of the recalled products and are experiencing fever, not eating well, excessive crying, low energy, or other symptoms.

If a formula was not included in the recall, families can still use it.

Because babies need a specific balance of nutrients, WIC and the American Academy of Pediatrics do not recommend making baby formula at home, and it is not safe to use cows’ milk or overly dilute the formula.

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