Franchise Opportunities in Charlotte, NC

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Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in Charlotte, NC will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

Assistance-with-state-licensing

Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News in Charlotte, NC

61 NC stores fined for overcharging customers

A total of 61 stores in 32 North Carolina counties were fined for price scanning errors that were overcharging customers, state inspectors said.CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Dozens of North Carolina stores, including several in the Charlotte area, were fined by the state over price scanning errors found during inspections that were ...

A total of 61 stores in 32 North Carolina counties were fined for price scanning errors that were overcharging customers, state inspectors said.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Dozens of North Carolina stores, including several in the Charlotte area, were fined by the state over price scanning errors found during inspections that were charging customers too much.

The North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services' Standards Division levied fines to 61 stores from 32 counties statewide because they were overcharging customers for items at checkout. Stores in the following Charlotte-area counties were fined: Catawba, Iredell, Mecklenburg, Rowan, Stanly, Union and Watauga.

The state conducts periodic, unannounced inspections at stores across North Carolina to check for accuracy between advertised prices and what customers pay at the register. If a store has a more than 2% error rate on overcharges, store management is notified and a stricter follow-up inspection will be scheduled.

WCNC Charlotte is always asking "where's the money?" If you need help, reach out to WCNC Charlotte by emailing [email protected].

Stores that fail price accuracy tests on a follow-up inspection are subjected to a fine. In addition to fines, stores will be subject to re-inspection every 60 days from the last inspection until meeting the 2% or less threshold for overcharges. If a store fails a re-inspection, additional penalties may be assessed. State leaders say many of the price scan errors are due to staffing issues facing companies.

"Overcharges cost consumers so we remain vigilant in inspecting stores in order to protect consumers," Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler said. "It is always a good practice for consumers to check their receipts as well as the price on the shelf to make sure that they are paying the correct amount and alert managers if they are not correct."

A Dollar General store on The Plaza in Charlotte paid $13,745 in fines after inspectors found a 40% error rate last November. Subsequent inspections found error rates of 23.67%, 16.33%, 8% and 8.67%, respectively. The store will be reinspected.

The Walmart on North Tryon Street paid $9,785 in fines after an initial inspection last October found a 7% error rate in a 100-item test. Subsequent inspections found similar error rates before the store passed inspection in June. The Indian Trail Walmart was issued $11,745 in fines after a 4% error rate as found in August of 2021. The store was reinspected multiple times and passed in May.

The most recent round of fines wasn't the first time stores in the Charlotte region have been caught overcharging customers. Seven stores were fined in the first quarter of 2022, including multiple Walmart and Dollar General locations. In total, 42 stores were fined earlier this year, according to state officials.

Consumers who would like to file a complaint about price scanner errors can call the Standards Division at 984-236-4750.

Hundreds of flights delayed, dozen canceled at Charlotte Douglas Airport over the weekend

About 166 of these are American Airlines flights, with another 64 of the flights being run by PSA Airlines, an American Airlines subsidiary.CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Over 270 flights have been delayed and dozens more are canceled at Charlotte Douglas International Airport on Sunday, according to Flight Aware.About 166 of these are ...

About 166 of these are American Airlines flights, with another 64 of the flights being run by PSA Airlines, an American Airlines subsidiary.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Over 270 flights have been delayed and dozens more are canceled at Charlotte Douglas International Airport on Sunday, according to Flight Aware.

About 166 of these are American Airlines flights, with another 64 of the flights being run by PSA Airlines, an American Airlines subsidiary.

This comes after over 600 flights were delayed and 50 were canceled at the airport on Saturday, and another 1,100 flights were canceled across the U.S. on Friday.

Last weekend, weather conditions left hundreds of flights delayed or canceled at the Charlotte Douglas Airport.

Scattered storms could trigger Sunday afternoon and evening across the region, according to WCNC Meteorologist Brittany Van Voorhees.

Elsewhere, pockets of heavy rain and frequent lightning are expected with any downpours.

Check back with WCNC Charlotte for updates and on our app.

Flashpoint is a weekly in-depth look at politics in Charlotte, North Carolina, South Carolina, and beyond with host Ben Thompson. Listen to the podcast weekly. SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts || Spotify || Stitcher || Google Podcasts

Wake Up Charlotte To Go is a daily news and weather podcast you can listen to so you can start your day with the team at Wake Up Charlotte. SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts || Spotify || Stitcher || TuneIn || Google Podcasts

All of WCNC Charlotte's podcasts are free and available for both streaming and download. You can listen now on Android, iPhone, Amazon, and other internet-connected devices. Join us from North Carolina, South Carolina, or on the go anywhere.

Charlotte radio personality wins Announcer of the Year in inaugural Quartet Music Awards

Long time gospel DJ recognized in international competition and only award recipient from North CarolinaCHARLOTTE, N.C. — James "G-man" Guy, nominated in two categories, won "Announcer of the Year" in the Quartet Music Awards, which recognizes those in gospel quartet music.Guy said, "Quartet music has been around for many, many years but they never had their own awards."The show was held in June in Atlant...

Long time gospel DJ recognized in international competition and only award recipient from North Carolina

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — James "G-man" Guy, nominated in two categories, won "Announcer of the Year" in the Quartet Music Awards, which recognizes those in gospel quartet music.

Guy said, "Quartet music has been around for many, many years but they never had their own awards."

The show was held in June in Atlanta after months of voting for different categories involving radio stations from all over the world.

"My journey's all about faith. I'm from the neighborhood around Charlotte. And they voted for me and I won," the Charlotte native said,

Originally approached at a car wash because of his mellifluous voice, Guy said he was actually listening to gospel music and felt it was a calling. He said he learned to talk in between records and give listeners spiritual guidance before the next song came on.

Guy remembered, "A lot of people wanna hear their name on the radio and everything. And they start calling in for prayer and I prayed for them. It just took it to another level."

Guy has been on the air for decades but said, it's only now that he's receiving attention.

"It seemed like in my later years, I'm 61 now, the Lord just showered me with the words and blessings," Guy said. "I need encouragement too. I give out a lot of encouragement but at times, I need it for myself. And I can find it in music."

Encouraging others, Guy said, is a gift he plans on continuing to share.

"It soothes the soul. And they can listen to some good gospel music. They can call in for a request. Maybe something they haven't heard in a long time, I can bring it to them," he said.

Guy's show airs on Sunday mornings from 6 to 8, on Streetz 103.3.

Flashpoint is a weekly in-depth look at politics in Charlotte, North Carolina, South Carolina, and beyond with host Ben Thompson. Listen to the podcast weekly.SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts || Spotify || Stitcher || Google Podcasts

All of WCNC Charlotte's podcasts are free and available for both streaming and download. You can listen now on Android, iPhone, Amazon, and other internet-connected devices. Join us from North Carolina, South Carolina, or on the go anywhere.

NC advocates working to make voting accessible for people with disabilities

Voters with disabilities still run into barriers at the polls, but one North Carolina group hopes fix that.CHARLOTTE, N.C. — As North Carolina gears up for the November election, advocates are working to make sure voting is accessible for everyone.Casting a ballot is supposed to be a smooth, easy process. However, for some, it can be quite the opposite."That was a very horrible experience for me,” Cherine Bentley said about voting in 2020.Bentley has cerebral palsy and ...

Voters with disabilities still run into barriers at the polls, but one North Carolina group hopes fix that.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — As North Carolina gears up for the November election, advocates are working to make sure voting is accessible for everyone.

Casting a ballot is supposed to be a smooth, easy process. However, for some, it can be quite the opposite.

"That was a very horrible experience for me,” Cherine Bentley said about voting in 2020.

Bentley has cerebral palsy and votes curbside. When she pulled up to her precinct in the last election, she said a poll worker questioned whether she had a disability. Then Bentley said, the volunteer made a comment that she was "too pretty to have a disability."

"I was so blown away,” Bentley recalled.

She added that incidents like these and barriers at the polls happen more often than many realize.

"A lot of times, people with disabilities feel discouraged, so they just won't vote,” Bentley said.

Disability Rights North Carolina is working to change that issue. The organization won a lawsuit in July 2022, challenging a North Carolina law that only allows a guardian or family member to help someone fill out an absentee ballot.

“The change is that the Federal Court has said that the state can't apply those rules to people with disabilities who need assistance,” Lisa Graftstein with DRNC explained.

Graftstein said they also won a lawsuit that makes voting more accessible for North Carolinians who are blind.

“The judge imposed a requirement that the state give people who are blind or low-vision access to the same online voting portal that people who are in the military or overseas are able to use to vote," Graftstein said.

This November, DRNC said it’s monitoring curbside voting and testing physical accessibility at polls across North Carolina. It also has audible voter guides and offers help for people that think their voting rights may have been violated.

As for Bentley, she’s not letting a bad experience discourage her from casting a ballot this November.

"It makes me want to push even harder and have a voice for those who are not as vocal as I am," she said.

If a Charlotte voter that has a disability has an issue at the polls, they can also contact Disability Rights and Resources.

N.C. teachers visit Holocaust museum to add new perspectives to classrooms

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A group of 31 North Carolina public school teachers spent a weekend in Washington, D.C., learning more about the Holocaust and how to teach it in classrooms across the state.The teachers spent two days exploring the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum along with guided workshops on how to apply what they learned to the classroom.What You Need To Know The trip, sponsored by the Stan Greenspon Holocaust and Social Justice Education Center at Queens University, had been on hold ...

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A group of 31 North Carolina public school teachers spent a weekend in Washington, D.C., learning more about the Holocaust and how to teach it in classrooms across the state.

The teachers spent two days exploring the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum along with guided workshops on how to apply what they learned to the classroom.

What You Need To Know

The trip, sponsored by the Stan Greenspon Holocaust and Social Justice Education Center at Queens University, had been on hold for two years due to COVID-19. This is the third time the center has sent teachers to D.C., but this year’s trip was overhauled to reflect current events.

“The Holocaust presents an opportunity for us to start this conversation. Very often, if you jump right into, ‘Why isn’t— why aren’t we teaching this? Why don’t people understand this?’ It puts up barriers and defensiveness,” Donna Tarney said.

Tarney is the education and outreach specialist at the Greenspon Center and led this year’s trip.

“If you talk about an event that we know so much about, that includes so many aspects of oppressing groups, neglecting voices, punitive and legislative actions against groups, that happened and we know the outcome. We can then ask, do we see things like that in our day-to-day? And we let the students decide, we don’t tell them what to think, we ask them what they think,” she continued.

The North Carolina Council on the Holocaust and North Carolina Holocaust Foundation help sponsor the trip, according to Tarney.

Tarney said with the two year gap between trips, they were able to refocus and prioritize the teachers’ experience while in D.C.

“A really important thing for teachers to look at when looking at the Holocaust and other local events in our own history, is why do we remember certain things and how do we remember those things?” Tarney said outside the bus. “Who tells the story? What is the narrative? Does that narrative change if we go to different places?”

The 31 teachers came from a variety of different spots across the state, teaching different age groups and subjects in the state’s public schools. Joanna Trudnak is an eighth grade social studies teacher in Catawba County.

“There is just so many kids that don’t have the opportunities, and there’s not enough people to be their light in the classroom. And I became a teacher because I want to show those kids every single one of them’s important,” Trudnak said about her desire to teach.

Trudnak was making the trip for the first time after hearing about it from a former teacher in her area.

“I started the process probably about four months ago with filling out essays, and just letting them know that I was a first-year teacher and I think this would be great to get more experience in the classroom and more content,” Trudnak explained.

The social studies teacher just completed her first year of teaching and said she was looking forward to taking lessons from the trip back to her classroom in the 2022-2023 school year.

“The biggest thing that I’m looking to take back to the classroom is more knowledge,” Trudnak said. “And just be really able to portray the empathy, and what we should feel whenever we look at this awful piece of history.”

When Spectrum News 1 caught up with Trudnak in D.C., she said how we learn about the Holocaust can be applied to how we study history today.

“If you look at the real world today and different things going on throughout the real world today, you’re able to see parallels. And, you’re able to see how history comes together, and how there are different things that cause implication between both things to collide,” Trudnak said outside the museum before day two of the trip.

Trudnak said after experiencing the museum, she is hoping to bring more empathetic views to the classroom and a more well-rounded side of history.

“From sadness, you then see a hope to help people realize what truly went on there. And to hope to educate for the future and hope to educate people further about all the awful and Nazi beliefs that happened during the time,” Trudnak added.

The Stan Greenspon Holocaust and Social Justice Education Center has taken 140 teachers to D.C. over multiple trips.

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