Franchise Opportunities in Detroit, MI

Service-Logo Service-logo

Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in Detroit, MI will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

Assistance-with-state-licensing

Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News in Detroit, MI

Neighborhood Beautification Program FAQs

1. What is the Neighborhood Beautification Program (NBP)?The Neighborhood Beautification Program is a mini grant program designed to fund 501(c)3 non-profit organizations, neighborhood associations, block clubs, faith-based, and nonprofit community-based in the city of Detroit to implement land-based projects that repurpose or beautify vacant lots in neighborhoods. Projects fall under three categories: Clean-Up Activities, Community Gardens, and Public Space Activities.2. How do I register for the Depar...

1. What is the Neighborhood Beautification Program (NBP)?

The Neighborhood Beautification Program is a mini grant program designed to fund 501(c)3 non-profit organizations, neighborhood associations, block clubs, faith-based, and nonprofit community-based in the city of Detroit to implement land-based projects that repurpose or beautify vacant lots in neighborhoods. Projects fall under three categories: Clean-Up Activities, Community Gardens, and Public Space Activities.

2. How do I register for the Department of Neighborhoods (DONs) to start a block club?

HOW TO GET STARTED - Contact your neighborhood District Manager’s district office in-person to turn in your block club application form or request an application. Instructions

https://detroitmi.gov/departments/department-neighborhoods/block-club-p…

3. Whose information should I provide in the User Information and Organization Information section?

The information in both the user information and organization information sections should reflect who is filling out the application. This will be the main contact person to whom the Program Administrator or HRD will contact for any questions or issues during the application review process. It will also be the person who will be notified of their grant award status, and who will be awarded.

4. How do I apply for the NBP Mini-Grants?Follow these steps to apply:

5. What documents should I present as the Fiscal agents? Fiscal agents should be prepared to provide the following financial documents for their organization:

6. I am a nonprofit organization that is acting as a fiscal agent for this grant award, but aside from accepting the grant funds, I will not participate in the project. Do I also need to register with the DONs?

No, if an organization is functioning solely as the fiscal agent for the grant award and will not participate in any of the programming activities, they do not need to register with the DONs. But the applicant will need to list the fiscal agent on their grant application and be prepared to submit financial documents on their behalf.

7. My project involves several entities, who would be receiving the grant funds? Which entity should be the one to complete the application? Although the project involves several entities, the application should be completed and submitted by the organization implementing the project. If the organization is not a non-profit, the fiscal sponsor that is a 501(c)3 should complete the application. Partner acting as the fiscal agent for grant funds should they be awarded8. I am a school/school district. Can I partner with a non-profit in my community?

Yes, a school or a school district may partner with a non-profit, if the lot is: not located on school grounds, owned by the school, is in the neighboring vicinity, and is used for public activity.

9. What expenses are eligible? Grant funds can be used to cover costs associated with delivering the Neighborhood Beautification Programs (i.e., materials, contractors, supplies, equipment, etc.).

10. What expenses are not eligible for funding? Funds awarded through this RFP cannot be used for:

11. Will insurance be provided during the construction of the project, and after the project?

Insurance is an eligible expense for the duration of the project if you request this expense in your budget.

12. When will the organization receive the land deed to the property? The Detroit Land Bank expects to deliver the deed to the property in approximately two weeks of receiving the Title Work.

13. Will the City of Detroit, or the Detroit Land Bank take the property back once it is improved?

The property purchased under this program will remain with the organization that has purchased the property. As owners of the property, you have all the rights and responsibilities of property ownership.

14. I operate a 501(c) 3 am I eligible to receive funding? Yes. However, you must partner with a registered Detroit Block Club, or Community Organization.

15. I previously purchased several lots from the Detroit Land Bank, can I apply for funding to improve these lots under this grant program? Private property is not eligible for funding. However, if you turn over the (deed) ownership of those lots to a block club, community organization.

16. My home, and the homes of seniors living in my area need improvements to their homes, can these funds be used to improve our private residence or private property? No. The funding restrictions do not allow for improving private property.

17. If my organization is not a designated 501(c)3, how will we receive our grant funds? If your organization is not a designated 501(c)3, the funding will go to the fiduciary for disbursement. The 501(c)3 will than issue the grant funds to your organization. For more information about the NBP, as well as the Notice of Funding Availability, the City’s website at http://www.detroitmi.gov/hrd  from there click: For Nonprofits and Community Groups, and then select Neighborhood Beautification Program.

18. I am a resident, and I would like to transfer the lots from my name to the neighborhood association’s name. What are the steps to make a deed transfer?

Steps to transfer Lot from Owner to LLC:

I. Notary (Not serviced by Wayne County) You may find a notary at any of the following locations: bank, insurance company, credit union, UPS Store, County Clerk or Law office.

II. Quit Claim Deed (400 Monroe St.)

III. Property Transfer Affidavit (CAYMC Building, 2 Woodward)

Note: Although it is not required by state law, it is RECOMMENDED that you register your deed.

Location Addresses: Wayne County Records Division (400 Monroe St. Detroit, MI 48226) 313 224 3561https://www.waynecounty.com/elected/deeds/home.aspx

CAYMC – 1st Floor Suite 130 (2 Woodward) 313 224 3400

19. How do I apply for an L.L.C?

Go to Form: LLC Form

Follow the Instructions on How to Apply for LLC in Michigan Video

For questions, you may also contact: Tamra Fountaine Hardy, Director, Neighborhood Services at [email protected] or Kerry Baitinger, Program Analyst at [email protected]

Benee at Saint Andrews Hall in Detroit, MI

Dreamer Boy (Zach Taylor) from Nashville, Tennessee gets things started with a set of alt-pop songs. He works the stage quickly from side to side, occasionally stopping to engage with the fans up front. Early on he gets so fired up running and jumping that he nearly falls into the photo pit. The crowd bounces and sings along to most songs and are having a great time. He plays a new song that the fans seem to like judging by how it gets them moving. He also gets the crowd to wave their arms from side to side during the song. ...

Dreamer Boy (Zach Taylor) from Nashville, Tennessee gets things started with a set of alt-pop songs. He works the stage quickly from side to side, occasionally stopping to engage with the fans up front. Early on he gets so fired up running and jumping that he nearly falls into the photo pit. The crowd bounces and sings along to most songs and are having a great time. He plays a new song that the fans seem to like judging by how it gets them moving. He also gets the crowd to wave their arms from side to side during the song. His nine-song set also includes songs such as “JUMPSHOT!,” “Puppy Dog,” and “Falling for the Wrong One.” He closes out his set with “Are You Letting Go?” where he gets down in the pit to greet fans up front. It is a high-energy set that leaves the fans cheering loudly.

The lights dim and the song “Make You Sick” starts to play. After a minute or two, New Zealand alt-pop singer Benee takes the stage to loud cheers and screams and transitions into the opening song “Tough Guy.” She playfully prances about the stage in white moon boots, accentuating the songs with her hands and facial expressions. “Happen to Me” from her 2020 hit album Hey U X finds her dancing and spinning about the stage. It also gets the fans moving as many are now bouncing and waving their arms. The next song “Same Effect” from the same album features some cool backlighting and once again has her dancing about the stage and playing up to the crowd and striking unique poses. Songs from Hey U X are heavily featured in her set tonight.

She takes a moment to mention that this is the first time she has played Detroit and loves it. Slowing the pace a bit, she plays “Find an Island” and follows that with “If I Get to Meet You” and “Soaked.” “Doesn’t Matter” from the 2022 EP Lychee shows off her unique vocal delivery. She is a breath of fresh air in a time when so many artists sound the same. When you hear her voice, you immediately know who it is. Moving on, she focuses heavily on songs from Lychee and Hey U X, starting with “Night Garden” and then “Marry Myself.” After “Winter,” she plays “Kool” which has her and the crowd bopping along. After “Beach Boy,” many fans yell “We love you!” Benee reciprocates with “I love you.”

She picks up the pace with a new untitled song that has the crowd clapping, while she actively bops about the stage, playing with her ponytails and shaking her head. She seems to be having as much fun as the fans. On “Soft Side,” her voice has some electronic effects and features just her and a backing track. Eventually, the band members come out and dance with her. At one point, Benee does the robot dance and the fans love it. The hit “Snail” features some cool beams of pink, green, and blue lights moving from side to side. The huge platinum-selling “Glitter” from her 2019 Fire On Marzz EP gets the fans screaming with glee before they join in singing the lyrics loudly, while Benee dances about the stage.

She closes out the evening with two fan favorites, the platinum hit “Supalonely” and the upbeat electronic-driven song “Sheesh.” Both have her and the crowd dancing and singing along. The bass, drums, and keyboards/synths are solid and further add to the dance-club vibe on several songs. At one point, she tells the crowd “you guys are crazy.” Before leaving the stage, she takes a moment to thank the crowd, makes a heart with her hands, and says she hopes to be back soon. The fans respond with huge cheers. It is a fun-packed evening by both artists.

BENEE Website Facebook Twitter

The Detroit Food Policy Council

Part of the Food Policy Councils in Action spotlight seriesName: Detroit Food Policy CouncilYear started: The Detroit Food Policy Council was established in 2009 by resolution of the Detroit City Council.Mission: The Council’s mission is “to influence policy which ensures the development and maintenance of a sustainable and equitable food system, resulting in a food-secure C...

Part of the Food Policy Councils in Action spotlight series

Name: Detroit Food Policy Council

Year started: The Detroit Food Policy Council was established in 2009 by resolution of the Detroit City Council.

Mission: The Council’s mission is “to influence policy which ensures the development and maintenance of a sustainable and equitable food system, resulting in a food-secure City of Detroit in which all of its residents are hunger-free, healthy, and benefiting from a robust food system.”

Members/Structure: The Council is comprised of 23 members who include stakeholders from various sectors of the food system, youth, and government representatives. The Council uses a consensus decision-making model in which all voices are heard and all those making decisions are willing to support the implementation of decisions made.

What they do: The Detroit Food Policy Council, which is comprised of local residents, is determined to create a sustainable, local food system that promotes food security, food justice, and food sovereignty in the city of Detroit. They do this through education, advocacy, and establishing policy.

How they do it: Council members meet the second Tuesday bi-monthly. They also convene the following subcommittees which are open to participation from community members:

Latest project/campaign: The Detroit Food Policy Council also leads the Detroit Grocery Store Coalition, which is a collaborative group of organizations working to improve and promote the grocery landscape within Detroit. In 2021, The Detroit Grocery Coalition launched a fellowship to pair community organizations with local stores and in 2022 they completed a statewide community engagement project working with SNAP recipients to craft policy change. The Coalition also facilitates the Great Grocer Project in collaboration with Wayne State University Center for Health and Community Impact, which aims to strengthen relationships between independently owned grocery stores and their customers in Detroit, while providing support to increase awareness and sales of healthy foods that foster economic vitality within Detroit neighborhoods.

Interesting fact about how they are working to positively affect the food system: In Fall 2020, the Detroit Food Policy Council received a grant from the State of Michigan Department of Health and Human Services via the Michigan Coronavirus Task Force on Racial Disparities to administer COVID-19 food relief efforts in the City of Detroit. The Council used this funding to collaborate with 12 other community-based organizations to implement a variety of projects designed to expand access to healthy food as well as support COVID relief efforts for Detroit residents. These projects included food distribution, cooking classes, distribution of personal protective equipment (PPE), and the installation of safety infrastructures.

FACT SHEET:

Website: https://www.detroitfoodpc.org/

Location: Julian C. Madison Building, 1420 Washington Blvd., Suite 230 Detroit, MI 48226

Number of staff: 3

Areas served: Detroit, Michigan

Director: Winona Bynum

Phone: 313-833-0396

Social Media: Follow the Detroit Food Policy Council on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter for updates on current work and emerging priorities.

Learn More:

Michigan is a top 10 state for private golf courses. Here are the 15 best tracks

Michigan, famed more for its Great Lakes and long winters, is an excellent golf state – which may surprise players from around the world who haven’t sampled its diverse offerings of elite public and private golf courses.In a recent breakdown of the best five public-access courses in each state, Golfweek’s Best – which employs a mix of more...

Michigan, famed more for its Great Lakes and long winters, is an excellent golf state – which may surprise players from around the world who haven’t sampled its diverse offerings of elite public and private golf courses.

In a recent breakdown of the best five public-access courses in each state, Golfweek’s Best – which employs a mix of more than 800 golfers around the world – rated Michigan as the seventh-best state to play elite golf courses at daily-fee or resort facilities. That put Michigan squarely in the conversation with warm-weather destinations such as California, Florida and Hawaii. Oregon leads that list, with Wisconsin in second.

But when it comes to elite private golf courses, Michigan jumps far ahead of its neighbor on the opposite side of Lake Michigan. Michigan comes in No. 7 in Golfweek’s Best ranking of elite private clubs in the U.S., following in the wake of No. 1 New York, No. 2 California and a lineup of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Georgia and Illinois. Michigan is ahead of stalwarts such as Florida, North Carolina and Arizona on the list. Wisconsin falls to No. 34 in this category.

Golfweek’s Best released its 2022 list of best private golf courses in each state this week. Check below to see which layouts top the lineup.

WANT TO GET AWAY?:Ranking Michigan's top 10 golf resorts and destinations for your Up North vacation

Golfweek's 15 best private golf courses in Michigan

1. Crystal Downs, Frankfort

2. Oakland Hills (South), Bloomfield Hills

THE COURSE:I played the newly restored South Course at Oakland Hills in Michigan. Here's my review

3. Kingsley Club, Kingsley

4. Dunes Club, New Buffalo

5. Franklin Hills, Franklin

6. Indianwood (Old), Lake Orion

7. Lost Dunes, Bridgman

8. Meadowbrook, Northville

9. Wuskowhan Player’s Club, West Olive

T10. Barton Hills, Ann Arbor

T10. Orchard Lake Country Club, Orchard Lake

12. Point O’Woods, Benton Harbor

13. Country Club of Detroit, Grosse Pointe Farms

14. Bloomfield Hills Country Club, Bloomfield Hills

15. Oakland Hills (North), Bloomfield Hills

Golfweek is part of the USA TODAY Network.

To access the Free Press' most exclusive sports content, like the stories linked above, become a Freep subscriber with this special offer.

Stay informed on what's happening across Michigan: Subscribe to our news alert emails.

Want more Michigan golf news? Download our free mobile app on iPhone & Android!

Let’s talk about Michigan’s invasive trees and shrubs: How to identify them and the threat they pose

There are two invasive trees and seven invasive shrubs that Michigan officials want residents to be aware of.The black locust tree was planted throughout the Midwest for erosion control, fence posts and fixing nitrogen in the soil but its leaves, stems, bark and seeds are toxic to horses.Most of the shrubs are a concern because they will outcompete native plants for resources. Below I’ll go over the trees and shrubs that Michigan has listed online, how to identify them and what threat they pose to you or the ecosystem....

There are two invasive trees and seven invasive shrubs that Michigan officials want residents to be aware of.

The black locust tree was planted throughout the Midwest for erosion control, fence posts and fixing nitrogen in the soil but its leaves, stems, bark and seeds are toxic to horses.

Most of the shrubs are a concern because they will outcompete native plants for resources. Below I’ll go over the trees and shrubs that Michigan has listed online, how to identify them and what threat they pose to you or the ecosystem.

This fast-growing tree has been planted throughout the Midwest for erosion control, fence posts, and fixing nitrogen in the soil. It forms dense colonies that can harm native vegetation. It’s also toxic to horses.

How to identify it:

Where is it found?

It is established in Michigan and prefers sun and well-drained soils but will grow in poor soils and disturbed areas including roadsides, open fields and forest openings. It has been planted throughout the Midwest, West Coast and Texas for erosoin control, fence posts and fixing nitrogen in the soil.

Why is it a concern?

Black locust spreads by root suckering and stump sprouting, forming dense colonies that shade prairies and forest openings, harming native vegetation. Black locust leaves, stems, bark and seeds are toxic to horses.

This fast-growing tree can reach up to 70 feet. It has been detected in Michigan. Its roots can damage sewers and structures, they also produce chemicals that inhibit the growth of other plants.

How to identify it:

Where is it found?

It has been detected in Michigan and can tolerate poor soils and drought but requires some sun. It can be found in old fields, forest edges and openings, and in urban environments where it was used in landscaping. It is widespread throughout most of the United States.

Why is it a concern?

Root shoots can develop into dense thickets. Roots can damage sewers and structures. Roots also produce chemicals that inhibit the growth of other plants.

Read: Let’s talk about Michigan’s invasive herbs: How to identify them and the threat they pose

This shrub can grow to 20 feet high and is established in Michigan.

How to identify it:

Where is it found?

It is moderately shade tolerant and occurs on a variety of soil types. It spreads rapidly in old fields and is also found in open woods, along forest edges, roadsides, sand dunes, and other disturbed areas.

Why is it a concern?

It was originally planted for wildlife food and habitat but it is highly aggressive. Its seeds are widely dispersed by birds and mammals. It can shade out native plants and fixes nitrogen in the soil, which can degrade native plant communities that thrive on low-nutrient soils. It is difficult to control because cut stumps and roots will resprout.

This small tree or shrub can reach 25 feet tall and is established in Michigan.

How to identify it:

Where is it found?

It can be found in disturbed and undisturbed areas like roadsides, pastures, old fields and woodlots.

Why is it a concern?

It spreads quickly and crowds out native shrubs and understory plants. It is a host for alfalfa mosaic virus and crown fungus, and may be a possible host for the soybean aphid.

This perennial and herbacious shrub can grow over 12 feet high and has been detected in Michigan.

How to identify it:

Where is it found?

It likes moist soils in sunny areas along roadsides, disturbed fields or vacant lots and along streams or river banks.

Why is it a concern?

Giant knotweed spreads aggressively by roots (rhizomes) and cut or broken stems. It can form dense thickets along streambanks, actually increasing erosion potential and decreasing habitat value.

This small tree or shrub can reach 18 feet tall and is established in Michigan.

How to identify it:

Where is it found?

It prefers sunlight in moist soils but can tolerate shade. It’s often found in wetlands, along fence rows, roadsides, open woods and in pastures.

Why is it a concern?

This invasive shrub is a threat to native plants in prairie fens and other ecologically important wetland communities. It is a host for alfalfa mosaic virus and crown fungus and may be a possible host for the soybean aphid.

This shrub is usually 1-2 feet tall, but can grow up to 6 feet in height. It’s established in Michigan.

How to identify it:

Where is it found?

It thrives in the sun or shade. It is often found in forests, pastures, and old fields. It can be found along woodland edges, roadsides, and disturbed areas.

Why is it a concern?

Japanese barberry is a common ornamental plant that can easily escape cultivation. Its seeds are dispersed by birds and wildlife. Plants are not browsed by livestock or wildlife due to thorns, giving it a competitive advantage over native plants. Shrubs form dense stands that displace native species. Japanese barberry can raise pH levels in soil.

This shrub can grow from 3 to 10 feet tall and is established in Michigan.

How to identify it:

Where is it found?

It can be found along roadsides, wetlands, wet depressions, woodland edges, and streams or river banks. It prefers full sun, but can tolerate some shade and a wide range fo soil and moisture conditions.

Why is it a concern?

Japanese knotweed grows very aggressively in disturbed areas. It excludes native plants by light limitation, nutrient cycling alterations and allelopathy (releasing toxic or inhibiting chemicals to suppress the growth of potential competitor plant species).

This shrub can grow up to 15 feet and is established in Michigan.

How to identify it:

Where is it found?

It is found in pastures, old fields, roadsides, forests, streambanks, and wetlands. It tolerates a broad range of soils and moisture conditions and can live in sun or shade.

Why is it a concern?

Multiflora rose spreads aggressively, both by rooting canes (ends of branches) and by seed dispersed by birds and wildlife. Dense thickets of this shrub crowd out beneficial shrubs and plants and may deter native birds from nesting.

You can visit Michigan’s invasive species website to learn more about these invasive trees, shrubs and other invasive species.

Copyright 2022 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit - All rights reserved.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.