Franchise Opportunities in Nashville, TN

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Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in Nashville, TN will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

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Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News in Nashville, TN

Teacher Appreciation Week: Free food and deals

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – Teacher Appreciation Week begins Monday, May 2, and ends on Friday, May 6.To thank educators, many businesses are offering discounts and specials.AdidasA special program from Adidas is giving teachers an exclusive discount of 30%, both online and in-stores, and 20% off at factory outlets. To get the discount, educa...

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – Teacher Appreciation Week begins Monday, May 2, and ends on Friday, May 6.

To thank educators, many businesses are offering discounts and specials.

Adidas

A special program from Adidas is giving teachers an exclusive discount of 30%, both online and in-stores, and 20% off at factory outlets. To get the discount, educators must verify with ID.me.

Barnes & Noble

Teachers who sign up for the B&N Educators program can receive a number of discounts, including 20% off the publisher’s list price on all purchases for the classroom and discounts of up to 25% off the publisher’s list price during Educator Appreciation Days.

Belle Meade Historic Site & Winery

Belle Meade Winery is giving educators a 50% discount on tickets for a Mansion Tour or Journey to Jubilee Tour. The discount is not available with tickets purchased online. When buying tickets at the door, the purchaser must show their teacher ID to receive the discount! The offer is not valid with other discounts.

The special runs through August 31, 2022.

Gaylord Hotels

To say thank you to all the teachers and school personnel and the work they do, Gaylord Hotels is offering special Educator Appreciation rates across their locations. Click here for more information. You will need a photo ID showing proof of employment at an educational institution when you check-in.

ID.me

Browse nearly 500 online and in-store offers that automatically apply at checkout. Just click here.

Michaels

Michaels offers teachers 15% off their entire purchase. Educators will need to complete the verification process through the Michaels Rewards program. For full details click here.

Nashville Sounds

On May 19, the Nashville Sounds are having Teacher Appreciation Night as they take on the Louisville Bats. Learn more here.

National Museum of African American Music

On Saturday, May 7, and Sunday, May 8, the National Museum of African American Music will have a special discounted rate for all Metro Nashville Public Schools teachers to tour the museum. The cost will be $11.50 with a valid MNPS photo ID.

Norwegian Cruise Line

Norwegian Cruise Line is “Giving Joy” with a brand-new contest. The company will reward 100 teachers across the country with a cruise aboard the Norwegian Prima. The top 3 grand prize winners will also receive a $25,000 donation for their schools.

Now through June 3, Norwegian Cruise Line is encouraging people to show their gratitude by nominating and voting for a deserving teacher.

Slim and Husky’s

Slim and Husky’s has a special deal this week for educators. You can get a Slim Signature Pizza (Cee No Green Signature excluded) and a fountain drink for $10. A valid work ID is required. One deal per customer and only available in-store.

The special offer runs through May 7, 2022.

Sonic

Sonic is giving away a free cheeseburger, with purchase during Teacher Appreciation Week. Every teacher or employee at a K-12 school or degree-granting university qualifies for the promotion. You’ll need to enroll in Sonic Teachers’ Circle in the Sonic app—a free awards program only available for educators.

The reward is valid one time May 3-17, 2022, for one free Sonic cheeseburger with any purchase online or in the Sonic app as a registered user.

The Nashville Shakespeare Festival

Middle Tennessee educators always receive free admission to the Summer Shakespeare Festival. Teachers will receive free stickers, posters, and a discount coupon on any NSF merchandise. This summer at oneC1TY Shakespeare’s CYMBELINE and August Wilson’s GEM OF THE OCEAN will be presented from August 18-September 11 and September 15-18 at Franklin’s Academy Park.

Those interested in bringing a group of students to the Summer Festival are asked to please contact NSF’s Education Director Katie Bruno at [email protected]org.

The offer is valid through September 18, 2022.

Thistle Farms

Thistle Farms is offering 15% off any non-sale product at the Shop at Thistle Farms and online at ThistleFarms.org with code: educator15.

The offer is not valid at The Café at Thistle Farms and runs through December 31, 2022.

Turnip Green Creative Reuse

Turnip Green Creative Reuse’s mission is to foster creativity and sustainability through reuse and to celebrate teachers, artists, and students. Everything at TGCR is pay-what-you-can to be an accessible resource to all. Learn more here.

Yazoo Brewing Company

All MNPS employees can get 20% off at the Yazoo Taproom at 900 River Bluff Drive. Just show your valid ID for the discount.

If you want to support Metro Nashville Public Schools outside of Teacher Appreciation Week, contact PENCIL for volunteer opportunities and to find more ways to get involved. Reach out to PENCIL at [email protected] or click here.

3 Tennessee students named in 58th class of U.S. Presidential Scholars

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — The U.S. Presidential Scholars Class of 2022 has released the names of 161 high school seniors who represent great accomplishments in academics, the arts, and career and technical education fields. Three of them hail from Tennessee.A Presidential Executive Order determined that 2022 U.S. Presidential Scholars are comprised of one young man and one young woman from each state, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, includes U.S. families living abroad and 15 chosen at-large, with 20 in the arts and 20...

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — The U.S. Presidential Scholars Class of 2022 has released the names of 161 high school seniors who represent great accomplishments in academics, the arts, and career and technical education fields. Three of them hail from Tennessee.

A Presidential Executive Order determined that 2022 U.S. Presidential Scholars are comprised of one young man and one young woman from each state, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, includes U.S. families living abroad and 15 chosen at-large, with 20 in the arts and 20 in career and technical education.

This year's Tennessee scholars are:

“Our 2022 Presidential Scholars represent the best of America, and remind us that when empowered by education, there are no limits to what our young people can achieve," said U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona. "Today, I join President Biden to celebrate a class of scholars whose pursuit of knowledge, generosity of spirit, and exceptional talents bring our nation tremendous pride."

"Throughout one of the most trying periods in our nation’s history and amid our recovery from the pandemic, our students have once again demonstrated their strength and that they have so much to contribute to our country," Cardona said. "Thanks to them, I know America's future is bright.”

The White House Commission on Presidential Scholars selects scholars annually based on their academic success, artistic and technical excellence, essays, school evaluations and transcripts as well as a demonstrated commitment to community service and leadership. More information about the private commission that makes selections is available on their website.

Candidates are considered for qualification based on College Board SAT and ACT exams, nominations made by chief state school officers, other recognition organizations and YoungArts, the National Foundation for the Advancement of Artists.

Of the 3.7 million students expected to graduate from high school in 2022, over 5,000 candidates qualified for awards.

To view the complete list of 2022 winners, visit the U.S. Department of Education website.

Where to expect interstate construction traffic in Middle Tennessee through Wednesday

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — Though the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) is working to improve roadways for ease of travel in the future, many lanes will be closing presently. Drivers looking to maximize drive time and plan ahead have many roadway projects to keep an eye on in the coming days.Broken down by county, here are the sites of construction and maintenance work to expect through Wednesday:Cheatham CountySR 455There will be continuous full road closure from the intersec...

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — Though the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) is working to improve roadways for ease of travel in the future, many lanes will be closing presently. Drivers looking to maximize drive time and plan ahead have many roadway projects to keep an eye on in the coming days.

Broken down by county, here are the sites of construction and maintenance work to expect through Wednesday:

Cheatham County

SR 455

There will be continuous full road closure from the intersection with SR 49 to the AO Smith entrance to SR 455 for construction of a levee, a box culvert, stream relocation and roadway construction. The Riverbluff Park entrance will remain open to the public, as will access to AO Smith from SR 12.

Davidson County

I-24

From 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. through Monday, there will be lane closures from both directions on I-24 over Mill Creek, near mile marker 58-59, to start bridge repair work. Two lanes will remain open at all times.

On Wednesday, from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., there will be a lane closure and rolling roadblock to take down the overhead sign on I-24 east at Murfreesboro Road.

There will be temporary intermittent closures on I-24 Eastbound on weekdays from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. off-ramp at Old Hickory Boulevard for concrete island installation and signal modification. These will involve Exits 60 and 62.

From 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., there will be lane closures on I-24 Eastbound at Exit 59 for construction of a retaining wall.

From 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. on weekdays, there will be lane closures for long line striping in both directions of I-24 from mile markers 32-27.

Weekdays from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., there will be lane closures both directions for setting overhead gantries between mile marker 53 and 60. Multiple rolling road blocks of 15 minute periods will take place.

I-40

From 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. on weekdays, there will be lane closures for long line striping in both directions of I-40, from mile marker 191-197 and mile marker 207-213.

There will be multiple, alternating lane and ramp closures on I-40 between Old Hickory Boulevard and Arlington Avenue for bridge epoxy operations from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m.

I-65

On I-65 and SR 254, there will be temporary lane closures in both directions from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays for grading work. At least one lane will remain open in each direction.

I-440

Tuesday, from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., expect milling and paving of I-440 Eastbound off-ramp to I-65 South.

SR 1

From 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., there will be alternating lane closures on SR 1, Murfreesboro Road, from Fesslers Lane to Foster Avenue to repair damaged concrete.

On weekdays from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., there will be multiple alternating lane closures on SR 1 from LM 13, south of Woodmont Boulevard, to LM 17, 15th Avenue.

From 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., there will be various Eastbound lane and shoulder closures of SR 1 from 7000-7100 Highway 70S for the excavation of trench and installation of storm drain piping.

From 7 p.m. to 6 a.m., there will be various Westbound lane and shoulder closures of SR 1 from 524-600 Murfreesboro Pike for the excavation of trench and installation of storm drain piping.

From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. there will be alternating lane closures on SR 1 from Hamilton Church Road to Mt. View Road.

SR 112

There will be a temporary alternating lane closure on SR 112 Clarksville Pike in both directions for grade work, storm drainage, sanitary sewer and overhaed power. There will also be a full closure of Fairview Drive for road grading and underground communicators, with a detour in place.

SR 155

On SR 155, Briley Parkway will experience lane closures from 7 p.m. to 5 a.m. on weekdays to repair the bridge at the Cumberland River, Cockrill Bend. One lane will remain open in each direction.

Marshall County

I-65

Sunday through Wednesday from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m., there will be emergency lane closures on I-65 Northbound for milling and paving operations. At least one lane will remain open.

Montgomery County

I-24

From 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., there will be lane closures both directions from mile marker 0-5 for milling and paving operations, as well as concrete ramp repairs at Exit 1. One lane will remain open at all times.

SR 12

A contractor will utilize one lane of traffic for safety and construction of a sidewalk from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m.

SR 13 and SR 149

There will be periodic flagging operations along SR 13 and SR 149 for clearing, grade work, bridge work and paving operations. Mayhew Road will remain closed.

Blasting operations will continue on SR 149.

SR 112 and SR 76

There will be intermittent closures for grading operations from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Robertson County

1-65

From mile marker 108-109, there will be alternating lane closures between 8 p.m. and 5 a.m. for setting a barrier rail Northbound.

Rutherford County

1-24

Weekdays from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., there will be lane closures both directions for setting overhead gantries between mile marker 53 and 60. Multiple rolling road blocks of 15 minute periods will take place.

SR 1

There will be alternating lane closure for construction activities from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

SR 266

There will be periodic flagging operations for construction from SR 102 to east of I-840, or LM 5-9, from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Sumner County

SR 109

From Airport Road to US-31, mile marker 1.5-3.5, there will be intermittent lane closures for intersection improvements from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

SR 174

From 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., SR 174 will also have intermittent lane closures for intersection improvements at the Upper Station Camp Creek Road intersection.

SR 386

From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. there will be intermittent outside shoulder closures both directions for survey work. All lanes of traffic will remain open, and traffic control will be provided by Sumner County Maintenance.

Williamson County

I-65

Tuesday and Wednesday, from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., there will be a lane closure on I-65 Southbound from mile marker 55-56 for barrier rail installation.

I-840

From mile marker 15-17, I-840 Westbound will be closed to do bridge repair work over South Garrison Branch. Westbound traffic will be shifted to the Eastbound side lane 1, and all Eastbound traffic will be running on lane 2. Traffic will remain in one lane for both directions for the entirety of the project.

There will be temporary lane closures in both directions of I-840 from mile marker 8 to east of Liepers Creek Road overpass, and from mile marker 18-29 for milling and paving operations. One lane will remain open in each direction.

SR 6

From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays, there will be intermittent stoppages of traffic and temporary lane closures — one direction at a time — for various construction activity, including paving and utility work from south of Moore's Lane to Concord Road, or mile marker 16-19. There will be extended delays and possible lane closures for side roads Ashby Drive, Holly Tree Gap Road, Long Street, West Concord, Wikle Road and Mt. View Road.

SR 96

Monday through Wednesday, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., there will be a lane closure on SR 96 for paving.

Also from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., there will be lane closures and brief stoppages of traffic for utility relocations and grading work from east of Arno Road to SR 252, or LM 14-21.

SR 106

For the replacement of a 60 inch corrugated metal pipe at mile marker 13.65, there will be continuous full road closure between Carnton Lane and Eastern Flank Circle until June 30. Traffic will be detoured via SR 6, Columbia Avenue, and SR 397, Mack Hatcher Parkway. Detour signs will be in place.

Wilson County

I-40

Through Wednesday, from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., I-40 at Exit 239 will have temporary lane closures for removal and installation of a portable barrier wall and emergency bridge repair over US70/Sparta Pike.

SR 171

From 8 p.m. to 5 a.m., SR 171 will have intermittent lane closures for bridge widening from mile marker 4-6.

In Nashville, Boisterous Fun and Decadent Eating

As the weather warms, travelers anxious to get back to honky-tonkin’ in Nashville can expect not only to find things much as they were prepandemic — Tootsies Orchid Lounge, Legends Corner and Robert’s Western World are still cranking out boisterous fun along Lower Broadway — but also a vertiginous ...

As the weather warms, travelers anxious to get back to honky-tonkin’ in Nashville can expect not only to find things much as they were prepandemic — Tootsies Orchid Lounge, Legends Corner and Robert’s Western World are still cranking out boisterous fun along Lower Broadway — but also a vertiginous number of new restaurants, hotels and music venues. They will also find one of the most impactful music museums to open anywhere in decades: the National Museum of African American Music.

There were losses, of course, such as the closing of Douglas Corner, the well-known music venue, and Rotier’s Restaurant, but venerated country music draws like the Ryman Auditorium, the Grand Ole Opry House and the small-but-mighty singer/songwriter venue, The Bluebird Cafe, made it through, as did most Nashville restaurants.

Indeed, according to the Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp. (NCVC) the city added a staggering 197 new restaurants, bars and coffee shops; a couple of jazzy retro bowling alleys; and 23 hotels in 2020 and 2021.

“I think we are one of the very few destinations that kept building while everything was shut down,” said Deana Ivey, the president of the NCVC. “We have more music, more restaurants, more hotels and a growing arts and fashion scene. If the early numbers we’ve received for March are correct, then March will be the best month in the city’s history.” As an indicator, she said, the preliminary number for hotel rooms sold in March 2022 was 7.6 percent higher than March 2019.

Currently, according to the NCVC, vaccination and masking requirements are being left up to businesses, and a number of music venues are requiring proof of a negative Covid-19 test, so visitors should contact those venues directly.

Culture and revelry

Nashville’s newest cultural gem, the National Museum of African American Music (NMAAM), opened last year at the long-planned 5th + Broadway, a complex of restaurants, shops, offices and residential space across the street from the Ryman Auditorium. The museum aims to tell the comprehensive story of African American music’s influence on American culture. Museum designers have done a noteworthy job of laying out the intersectionality of varying genres in the 56,000-square-foot facility where videos of musicians are in constant rotation.

Numerous artifacts on display include B.B. King’s guitar “Lucille,” George Clinton’s wig and robe, and a microphone used by Billie Holiday. Storytelling is partitioned into six main rooms, five dedicated to specific genres, including R&B, hip-hop, gospel, jazz and blues, with rock ’n’ roll mingled throughout. The main gallery, Rivers of Rhythm, ties it all together within the context of American history. The museum also informs visitors that Jimi Hendrix, Little Richard and Etta James all spent time singing and playing in Nashville.

In the revelry lane, Nashville now has two venues with a common theme, Brooklyn Bowl Nashville, in the Germantown neighborhood, and Eastside Bowl, in Madison. Both claim a stylish 1970s décor and vibe that combine bowling with a restaurant/bar/music experience. The music venue at Brooklyn Bowl Nashville, based on the original Brooklyn Bowl in, well, Brooklyn, seats 1,200. Jimmy Fallon hopped onstage in February to join the local Grateful Dead cover band The Stolen Faces, and Grand Ole Opry’s new inductee, Lauren Alaina, recently played; Neko Case is scheduled for August.

Over in Madison, Eastside Bowl, which seats 750, is also bringing in respected talent. The singer-songwriter Joshua Hedley performed in April, and the Steepwater Band rockers are scheduled for May. Eastside Bowl has regular bowling and “HyperBowling,” a cross between pinball and bowling with a reactive bumper used to navigate the ball. The food includes the much-missed shepherd’s pie from the Family Wash, an Eastside institution that closed in 2018.

Eat and sleep

Nashville fans coming back to the city for the first time in two years will find a food scene still ramping up at breakneck speed with the chef and founder of Husk, Sean Brock, doing some heavy lifting. In 2020, he opened Joyland, a burgers and fried chicken joint, and, on the other end of the spectrum, the Continental, an old-school, fine-dining restaurant in the new Grand Hyatt Nashville. Recent dishes there included tilefish with crispy potatoes, leeks and watercress, and an unforgettable whipped rice pudding with lemon dulce de leche and rice cream enveloped in a sweet crisp. Last fall, Mr. Brock launched his flagship restaurant, Audrey, in East Nashville, which centers on his Appalachian roots; upstairs his high-concept restaurant, June, is where he hosts “The Nashville Sessions,” which highlight tasting menus created by notable chefs.

Other renowned chefs are finding a place in Nashville. The French chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten developed the concept for the new restaurant Drusie & Darr at the recently renovated Hermitage Hotel, and the James Beard Award-winning chef Andrew Carmellini has brought in Music City outposts of New York’s The Dutch and Carne Mare, both at the newly installed hotel W Nashville in the Gulch neighborhood. Others are adding on; RJ Cooper, also a James Beard winner, launched Acqua, next door to his swanky Saint Stephen in Germantown last month.

For both locals and travelers, the opening of a second Pancake Pantry downtown is relieving fans of having to wait in line at the Hillsboro Village location for the shop’s made-from-scratch flapjacks (their heavenly sweet potato pancakes with cinnamon-cream syrup come to mind). Similarly, the much-applauded Arnold’s Country Kitchen on 8th Avenue South now has a night and weekend schedule to accommodate the usual crush of meat-and-three fans. Cheering things up on the West End Corridor is the historic and colorful Elliston Place Soda Shop, back after relocating to 2105 Elliston Place. The ice-cream shop had been in operation for over 80 years right next door, and now has a polished-up menu, a full bar and, you guessed it, a stage for live music.

Certainly, there won’t be a dearth of accommodations for visitors any time soon. The city added 4,248 hotel rooms over the last two years. The 130-room, hipster-forward Moxy Nashville Vanderbilt is the first hotel ever to open in cozy Hillsboro Village, and the massive new luxury monolith, the Grand Hyatt Nashville, downtown has one of the highest rooftop bars in the city, along with seven restaurants.

Travel Trends That Will Define 2022

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Cruises. Despite a bumpy start to the year, thanks to Omicron’s surge, demand for cruises remains high. Luxury expedition voyages are particularly appealing right now, because they typically sail on smaller ships and steer away from crowded destinations.

Destinations. Cities are officially back: Travelers are eager to dive into the sights, bites and sounds of a metropolis like Paris or New York. For a more relaxing time, some resorts in the U.S. are pioneering an almost all-inclusive model that takes the guesswork out of planning a vacation.

Experiences. Travel options centered around sexual wellness (think couples retreats and beachfront sessions with intimacy coaches) are growing popular. Trips with an educational bent, meanwhile, are increasingly sought after by families with children.

On the extreme luxe side (think “curated pillow menu” and original art in each room) the Joseph, which began taking reservations on Korean Veterans Boulevard in mid-2020, brought in the Michelin-starred chef Tony Mantuano to oversee the food at the hotel’s restaurant Yolan.

Some losses

Nashville’s gains over the past two years did not come without some collective gasps at the losses. The popular Sutler Saloon in the Melrose neighborhood announced in March that it would be shutting down. The closing, also in March, of the Ernest Tubb Record Shop, a country music institution on Lower Broadway, surprised the city, as did the closing of Douglas Corner after 33 years of helping launch some careers (Trisha Yearwood, and Alan Jackson, for starters). The beloved Rotier’s Restaurant, which had operated off West End Avenue since 1945 will also be missed, and the George Jones Museum, which had only been in operation downtown for six years, shut down in 2021, citing the pandemic. Finally, after being a generator of family memories for generations, Chaffin’s Barn Dinner Theater called it quits in 2020.

Still, it seems every day in Nashville there is fresh news about a restaurant, cafe or honky-tonk swinging open its doors. Just this month, Garth Brooks announced that he had purchased a property on Lower Broadway, and teased the name of his future bar on Twitter with a video of his new three-story building and letters slowly spelling out “Friends in Low Places,” one of Mr. Brooks’ finest bar anthems.

Rising home costs propel Nashville couple to move out of state

Chelsea Fitzgerald-Dole really likes living in Nashville, Tennessee."I fell in love with the city," she says. "I've met so many incredible people.""The food scene is awesome," her husband, Kevin Dole, chimes in. "The music scene is unparalleled. It's a really fun city to be in."The couple has been crammed into a small two-bedroom condo they bought in 2018. Working remotely has made it only harder.Kevin is a musician on the side, and his drum set is in the middle of the livin...

Chelsea Fitzgerald-Dole really likes living in Nashville, Tennessee.

"I fell in love with the city," she says. "I've met so many incredible people."

"The food scene is awesome," her husband, Kevin Dole, chimes in. "The music scene is unparalleled. It's a really fun city to be in."

The couple has been crammed into a small two-bedroom condo they bought in 2018. Working remotely has made it only harder.

Kevin is a musician on the side, and his drum set is in the middle of the living space.

The couple desperately wants more space. So the two are planning to move away from this city they love because they can't afford a bigger house there. Prices have just risen too much.

"Everything around us has just exploded," Kevin says.

Chelsea and Kevin are planning to leave Nashville, work remotely and move four hours away to Covington, Ky., near Cincinnati. Kevin has family there. And they say they can buy a three-bedroom home for about $250,000 — half the price it would cost in Nashville.

Nashville is one of many formerly affordable cities that have drawn remote workers and retirees from higher-cost places such as New York and California during the coronavirus pandemic. Tech companies including TikTok and Oracle are opening offices there, creating new jobs. All that has pushed up prices.

"Nashville is like raging on fire ... very, very strong house price growth," says Mark Zandi, the chief economist at Moody's Analytics. He says during the past two years of the pandemic, prices there are up a whopping 45%.

Chelsea says the increase in prices doesn't feel normal.

"This can't last forever, whatever it is that's happening," she says. "All of the locals being pushed out of Nashville and people not being able to afford homes — it just can't keep happening." Chelsea and Kevin don't pull in big salaries, and they have a lot of student loan debt.

Some economists, including Zandi, think prices could fall — at least in dozens of the most juiced-up markets.

"I expect prices to come down," Zandi tells NPR. "If you told me two years from now, prices are 5, 10, 15% below where they are today where they're peaking, I'd say that sounds about right to me."

Zandi has estimated just how overvalued homes are in more than 400 cities and towns across the United States. He compared today's actual prices with where he would have expected prices to be based on historical trends.

So, for example, he finds Boise, Idaho, at the top of the list, 73% overvalued. It's 51% in Flagstaff, Arizona. That doesn't mean he thinks prices will fall by that much though.

Kevin Dole relaxes at home.

Chelsea Fitzgerald-Dole

"I don't expect a collapse in house prices," he says. He is not predicting a housing crash anything like what we saw 15 years ago, because of two fundamental forces supporting home prices.

"One is supply — there's a shortage of homes available," says Zandi. Econ 101 suggests that strong demand coupled with low supply will keep prices pretty high.

Also, many homebuilders went out of business after the housing bubble collapsed; home construction was stunted for much of the past decade. And now, we are about 4 million homes short of what the country needs, according to the mortgage industry giant Freddie Mac.

In places with plenty of land and not many zoning restrictions, such as Texas and Arizona, homebuilders will eventually increase supply. But Zandi says, "While builders are ramping things up, it's going to take a long time for them to catch up ... to the underlying demand that exists."

The other reason a crash is unlikely: New federal rules have put an end to the reckless mortgage lending that led to the housing bubble 15 years ago. This time around, people can afford their loans. "Lenders have been very cautious," Zandi says. Under the new rules, homebuyers have to document their income and ability to repay the loans.

And lenders are not putting people into exotic adjustable-rate loans where payments jump up sharply, which is what happened before the last crash. The vast majority of mortgages now are 30- or 15-year fixed-rate loans.

For those same exact reasons, some economists don't think we'll even see a mild drop in home prices anytime soon.

The full NPR article can be read here.

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