Franchise Opportunities in Nashville, TN

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Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in Nashville, TN will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

Assistance-with-state-licensing

Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News in Nashville, TN

Top 5 cities out-of-towners move to in Tennessee

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — With our strong job market, good weather, and affordability, more and more out-of-towners are discovering there’s no place like Tennessee.The saying goes “if you’re not growing you’re dying” and thankfully, it looks like Tennessee is alive and well.According to the latest census, Tennessee’s population grew nearly 9 percent over the past decade.Murfreesboro grew the most, percentage-wise during that same time and the upward trend continues.“...

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — With our strong job market, good weather, and affordability, more and more out-of-towners are discovering there’s no place like Tennessee.

The saying goes “if you’re not growing you’re dying” and thankfully, it looks like Tennessee is alive and well.

According to the latest census, Tennessee’s population grew nearly 9 percent over the past decade.

Murfreesboro grew the most, percentage-wise during that same time and the upward trend continues.

“We have a lot of people coming in from California who maybe don’t like living in California anymore; the pricing there is significantly higher than here, but you still get a lot of the shopping, a lot of the scenery,” Amanda Peterson said, a realtor with the Ashton Group of RE/MAX Advantage.

MoveBuddha’s latest Tennessee migration report shows that California dominated inflow into Tennessee this year. Nearly a quarter (22.14%) of all search queries for moves into Tennessee are from the Golden State. The next largest contributors are Florida (8.12%), Texas (5.40%), Illinois (5.34%), and Colorado (4.03%).

But where are they moving?

Data shows most are choosing Chattanooga -the city seeing 300 moves in for every 100 out.

“A lot of people are moving there right now for remote work, opportunity, the cost of living is really low,” Kristen Klepac, Content Marketing Specialist, Green Flag Digital said.

Movers’ second choice is Johnson City, with 273 moves in for every 100 out.

Coming in third is a tie between Nashville and Knoxville, both seeing as many as 181 moves in for every 100 out.

“It’s not necessarily the same amount of people, it’s the same amount of weight on the city,” Klepac said.

Topping out the five most popular places to move, Brentwood – a city that boasts luxury homes and some of the best schools in the state.

In neighboring counties, inflow is also up, especially in cities like Spring Hill (No.8), Mount Juliet (No.9), Franklin (No. 10), and Murfreesboro (No.11).

On the other end of the spectrum, Memphis has seen a sustained period of more outbound than inbound traffic, losing 20 percent of residents between 2010 and 2020.

Other areas seeing more residents move out than in, according to moveBuddha are Gallatin and Antioch.

“That really surprises me because Antioch’s price point is a little bit lower, so I feel a lot of people are still moving into Antioch for price points,” Peterson said.

The 2022 data comes directly from moveBuddha which was collected from Jan 1 to May 4, 2022 for those looking to move throughout the year. Our city-based analysis includes over 4K queries in Tennessee alone.

7 firefighters, 3 residents transported following apartment fire

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WSMV) - Ten people were hospitalized following an apartment fire Wednesday. WSMV 4 spoke with one man who jumped from the balcony of his home to escape the flames.Seven firefighters were transported with heat-related injuries, and another firefighter had minor burns. In addition, three residents were taken to the hospital with unknown injuries.The fire was reported around 2:30 p.m. at Foxcroft Apartments on Paragon Mills Road. When crews approached the scene, they could see smoke from Nolensville Pike.C...

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WSMV) - Ten people were hospitalized following an apartment fire Wednesday. WSMV 4 spoke with one man who jumped from the balcony of his home to escape the flames.

Seven firefighters were transported with heat-related injuries, and another firefighter had minor burns. In addition, three residents were taken to the hospital with unknown injuries.

The fire was reported around 2:30 p.m. at Foxcroft Apartments on Paragon Mills Road. When crews approached the scene, they could see smoke from Nolensville Pike.

Crews noted that heavy smoke was coming from a breezeway of one of the buildings as soon as they arrived. NFD said a second alarm response was called on the fire for manpower due to the heat outside and the working conditions for first responders.

“Incident Command wants to ensure that there is enough personnel to rotate until the situation is under control and the response will be downgraded,” said NFD officials.

“I look outside, and it was dark,” Lazaro Gonzales said. “Smoky dark. It was real dark. Flames kicked in. I was like, ‘my building is on fire.’

Gonzales’s home, where he lived for three years, is gone. “It is hard,” Gonzales said. “It is really hard. “I know it is material stuff, but it was all the memories and pictures of my kids when they were born.”

Gonzales and his three little girls were home Wednesday afternoon when their building at the Foxcroft Apartments in South Nashville caught fire. “I got my 4-year-old in the back room with me asleep, and my 7-year-old and 9-year-old,” Gonzales said. “First thing I did, I went in and grabbed my four-year-old and threw her out of the balcony. I got my two others and did the same thing.”

While the building was engulfed in flames, Gonzales tried to return for their four pets. “By the time I reached them, I couldn’t breathe,” Gonzales said. “I had to crawl to the balcony and just jump off myself.”

Gonzales and his daughters landed on white containers below his unit. They are all okay, but the same cannot be said for some other residents. Three were taken to the hospital. Seven firefighters were also hospitalized. Most of the firefighters were transported because of the extreme heat.

“You are spraying water onto a fire which contains steam,” Nashville Fire Department Public Information Officer Kendra Loney said. “Steam is hot. “You are already amping up how hot it is. You have the body temperature and gear and adding the steam element, so these conditions are not ideal at all.”

Gonzales’s wife was at work during the fire and returned home to see their unit gone. The family does not know where to turn next. “Me as a father, I don’t know,” Gonzales said. “I don’t know where to start or what to do.” A fundraiser for the Gonzales family has been set up here.

A shelter is set up for these residents at the Croft Middle Design Center on Elysian Fields Road.

In a press conference, NFD PIO Kendra Loney confirmed that ten people in total, seven firefighters and three residents, have been transported with mostly fire-related injuries. One of the victims reportedly had burns on their neck. The three residents were confirmed to be two adults and one child. The conditions of the victims are unknown at this time.

Firefighters also attempted to make the entrance to see if any residents were still inside; however, the building quickly collapsed, causing crews to evacuate. A third alarm will likely be called to provide more crews at the scene because of the heat.

Metro Nashville Public Schools provided two air-conditioned buses for firefighters to help recover while fighting the fire.

Building B, the building where the fire occurred, has 20 units. Initial 911 calls indicated there could be residents trapped inside apartments. Firefighters checked one apartment where one of the calls came from and confirmed no one was inside. However, when approaching a second unit where a call was received, firefighters had to retreat because the ceiling collapsed.

The American Red Cross has set up a shelter for tonight at Croft Middle Design School, about a mile from the apartment complex.

Firefighters will resume the interior search when it’s safe to proceed.

Copyright 2022 WSMV. All rights reserved.

Know before you go: Hot weather, road closures and entertainment at Nashville Pride 2022

Pack the sunscreen, carpool with friends, and check out the free parade at Tennessee's largest pride festival this weekend in Nashville.Here's everything to know about Nashville Pride 2022:Parade starts the funThe parade kicks off the festivities for the weekend at 10 a.m. Saturday on the corner of Br...

Pack the sunscreen, carpool with friends, and check out the free parade at Tennessee's largest pride festival this weekend in Nashville.

Here's everything to know about Nashville Pride 2022:

Parade starts the fun

The parade kicks off the festivities for the weekend at 10 a.m. Saturday on the corner of Broadway and Eighth Avenue. The parade will march down Lower Broadway to Second Avenue. It is free to attend.

The parade grand marshals are TJ Osborn, Leslie Jordan, Greg Cason and Alberta Hardison. The parade will take place across one mile and is expected to last two and a half hours. It will feature 112 entries and over 18,000 participants.

How to get to the fest

Festival organizers recommend using rideshare or biking to the festival to ease the strain on downtown parking and traffic volumes.

There are three designated rideshare pickup and drop-off locations:

The festival map also shows a bike parking area near Seventh Avenue and Harrison Street.

Sunny skies and high temperatures

Saturday will be sunny and hot, with a high near 100, the National Weather Service Nashville forecasted. The evening will be mostly clear with a low around 77.

There is a 30% chance of showers and thunderstorms Sunday, which will otherwise be mostly sunny and hot. The high will be near 101, NWS said.

A 30% chance of showers and thunderstorms will continue into a mostly cloudy Sunday night with a low around 72.

Road closures all weekend

Tuesday, June 21 - Thursday, June 23

Friday, June 24 - Monday, June 27

Saturday, June 25

Entertainment

The highly anticipated lineup of entertainment includes WALK THE MOON on Saturday and Tanya Tucker on Sunday. The schedule of musical acts will take place across three stages on the festival grounds.

More than 225 local and regional vendors will be available, including food trucks and merchandise tents.

There will be a kids and family zone with face painting and carnival games, and a youth area featuring a community mural.

How to buy tickets

Saturday or Sunday general admission tickets are available for $5 each, and an all-weekend ticket is also available for $10. There are additional VIP packages available for purchase at nashvillepride.org.

Tickets will also be available for purchase at the festival main gate on Harrison Street.

Safety and security

Vanderbilt first aid and medical staff will be on site at the festival and along the parade route for medical emergencies. Any alerts regarding the festival will be sent out on the Nashville Pride social media accounts.

Nashville Pride uses a private security contractor during the parade and festival.

Reach reporter Molly Davis at [email protected] or on Twitter @mollym_davis.

TDOE Awards $27M TN ALL Corps Grants to Five Community Partners Expanding High-Dosage, Low-Ratio Statewide Tutoring Program

Nashville, TN—Today, the Tennessee Department of Education announced five regional community-based organizations have been awarded a Tennessee Accelerating Literacy and Learning Corps (TN ALL Corps) Community Partner Grant to launch new tutoring programs in the 2022-23 school year, serving up to 18,000 Tennessee students with free tutoring services.Each grant awardee is responsible for recruiting and hiring tutors as well as coordinating with regional districts for student selection in grades 1-8 and design of t...

Nashville, TN—Today, the Tennessee Department of Education announced five regional community-based organizations have been awarded a Tennessee Accelerating Literacy and Learning Corps (TN ALL Corps) Community Partner Grant to launch new tutoring programs in the 2022-23 school year, serving up to 18,000 Tennessee students with free tutoring services.

Each grant awardee is responsible for recruiting and hiring tutors as well as coordinating with regional districts for student selection in grades 1-8 and design of the local tutoring program.

The grant awardees are as follows:

"The department is excited to grow our high-dosage, low-ratio tutoring program, TN ALL Corps, to include new community partners across the state and increase the number of opportunities available for student learning,” said Commissioner Penny Schwinn. “Tennessee continues to demonstrate our shared commitment to students and academic achievement, and we are thrilled to engage strong community partners across the state to provide essential support and help put all students on a path to success.”

In January 2021, Governor Bill Lee convened the Tennessee General Assembly for a special legislative session to pass policies to help mitigate COVID-19 disruptions and support Tennessee students, including establishing the Tennessee Accelerating Literacy and Learning Corps (TN ALL Corps). Leveraging federal ESSER dollars, 83 Tennessee school districts opted to participate in the state’s TN ALL Corps program to receive matching grants from the department to further implement and strengthen tutoring services they could provide to students.

Community partner grant awardees will follow the state’s high-dosage, low-ratio model for tutoring within their local program, which means English Language Arts (ELA) and math tutoring will be provided in small groups to students not currently being served through existing TN ALL Corps programs at a 1:3 adult to student ratio in grades 1-5, and 1:4 adult to student ratio in grades 6-8.

"Our team is eager to begin this powerful intervention work to get students back on track,” said Matt Ryerson, CEO, United Way Greater Knoxville. “While this is a win for us and our partners, it's most importantly a win for the kids in East Tennessee that will receive focused tutoring, caring mentors, and a community of folks cheering them on."

“The Niswonger Foundation is proud to be part of this visionary work. It is exciting to think about joining forces across the state, to ensure that our children have the best possible start to their future,” said Nancy Dishner, President and CEO, Niswonger Foundation. “Having seen the power of high-dosage, low-ratio tutoring in national research and in our Foundation's current work, I am convinced that this is the right direction for our students' success.”

"Raise Your Hand is so excited to work with our community partners and help first- through eighth-grade students increase their overall academic success," said Sonya Johnson, Manager of Education Initiatives, United Way of Greater Nashville. "A core focus at United Way is ensuring every child in our community has an equal chance to learn and succeed. Through this grant, we can add an extra layer of confidence to strengthen the literacy and comprehension skills for each student that will prepare them to achieve reading proficiency and succeed in school and beyond."

“We believe literacy has the game-changing ability to help children reach the critical skills necessary for them to achieve success,” said Sam O’Bryant, Executive Director, Literacy Mid-South. “To that end, Literacy Mid-South has a targeted focus to use these funds to make a significant impact in our schools and neighborhoods. We are very grateful to the Tennessee Department of Education for this investment in our work.”

“This grant directly aligns with our mission at United Way of uniting people and resources to build a stronger, healthier community--in this case, the kids who need additional resources to get on track in school,” said Abby Garrison, VP of Community Investments, United Way of Greater Chattanooga. “We are excited to partner with TDOE, our local school systems, community partners, and families to invest in our kids.”

For Tennessee Department of Education media inquiries, contact [email protected].

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Drought conditions may be on the way for Middle Tennessee

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – With two back-to-back heat waves and little rain in sight, Middle Tennessee may be edging closer to drought. Currently, 13.7% of Tennessee is abnormally dry, and no substantial rain is in the forecast this week.Sam Shamburger, Lead Forecaster at the National Weather Service Office in Nashville, says it will take a pattern shift to get Middle Tennessee out of these hot and dry conditions. &ldqu...

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – With two back-to-back heat waves and little rain in sight, Middle Tennessee may be edging closer to drought. Currently, 13.7% of Tennessee is abnormally dry, and no substantial rain is in the forecast this week.

Sam Shamburger, Lead Forecaster at the National Weather Service Office in Nashville, says it will take a pattern shift to get Middle Tennessee out of these hot and dry conditions. “There’s this really persistent upper-level ridge of high pressure over the southern US. And that’s just going to keep the heat around, if not right over us, pretty close by, so not looking for any big rain chances until maybe the end of the month. So we’ll have to see a really big pattern change occur before we get out of this hot, dry pattern.”

If rain doesn’t move in, parts of Middle Tennessee may enter into Moderate Drought by July according to Shamburger, “Moderate droughts when we see prolonged dry conditions, we’re really below normal on rainfall, the soil moisture is really low. And we’re just experiencing severe crop issues, severe agricultural issues, or even problems with the low water supply or low water in the rivers and lakes and that kind of thing. So when we see moderate drought conditions, we’re starting to get into some pretty substantial issues.”

A hot and dry weather pattern also brings fire concerns ahead of the Fourth of July holiday. “The main concern we have right now is July 4 is coming up and people are starting to launch fireworks,” said Shamburger. “Since it is getting drier, and it’s staying so hot, there is the risk for some of those fireworks to start some grass fires or brush fires out there. So we just asked people to use extra caution if they’re outdoors launching fireworks as they could cause some fires to quickly grow and spread and these abnormally dry and hot conditions.”

One thing that is in Middle Tennessee’s favor right now is that rainfall has been above-normal for the entire year. Soil moisture levels remain healthy and water levels are not significantly impacted by the dry conditions currently. However, a few more weeks of little to no rain will cause problems.

“We are actually quite a bit above normal for rainfall for the year. So Nashville is over three inches above normal for rainfall so far this year. Like I said, we’ve still got quite a bit of water in the ground. And if it can start to dry out this week, and if we don’t get any rain next week, especially, then it’s really gonna start to lower that soil moisture, and we’re gonna start to see drought conditions.”

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