Franchise Opportunities in Omaha, NE

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Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in Omaha, NE will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

Assistance-with-state-licensing

Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News in Omaha, NE

11 arrested after FBI Omaha investigation uncovers $2.5 million in PPP fraud

OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) - The FBI announced Wednesday that 11 people had been arrested in an investigation into fraudulent CARES Act spending.A grand jury indicted 11 people with a connection to Omaha for taking advantage of programs aimed at helping struggling businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic: Carl Estwick, Jackie Harper, Tarysh G. Hogue, Richard L. Kelly, Lenfield Kendrick, Henry T. Lewis, Trevor A. McNeil, Michael A. Perkins, Michael A. Perkins Jr., Shawn Prater, and Ramel Thompson. Nine of them were arrested in Omaha; McNeil was...

OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) - The FBI announced Wednesday that 11 people had been arrested in an investigation into fraudulent CARES Act spending.

A grand jury indicted 11 people with a connection to Omaha for taking advantage of programs aimed at helping struggling businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic: Carl Estwick, Jackie Harper, Tarysh G. Hogue, Richard L. Kelly, Lenfield Kendrick, Henry T. Lewis, Trevor A. McNeil, Michael A. Perkins, Michael A. Perkins Jr., Shawn Prater, and Ramel Thompson. Nine of them were arrested in Omaha; McNeil was arrested by the FBI in Atlanta and Kendrick was arrested by agents in Las Vegas.

The U.S. Attorney said authorities believe 58-year-old Thompson was the ringleader, saying he would give direction and guidance to the others when applying for payroll protection loans and economic injury disaster loans — financial mechanisms made available to businesses having trouble staying afloat during the pandemic. Investigators said they believed he would also get kickbacks from at least five of the defendants.

According to state court records obtained by WOWT 6 News, Thompson spent 270 days in jail in 2017 for Evading Income Tax and Filing Fraudulent Nebraska Income Tax Returns.

Investigators said the group applied for more than $7.6 million in loans and received $2.5 million. Some of the businesses were real, but some were made up, authorities said. But they said the information on the loan applications — from number of employees to payroll and revenue estimates — was overinflated.

“When you’re ripping off a program that is designed to help struggling businesses — that’s especially galling,” U.S. Attorney Jan Sharp said Wednesday.

The government listed a number of businesses in the indictment that were used in the scheme: Smokin Gunz Bar B Que, Mr. C’s Rims & Tire Sales, Sprague Street Auto, Kelly Auto Detailing, Kendrick & Kendrick Construction, Perkins & Perkins Construction, McNeils Cleaning, Hogue Enterprises, Neat Fleet, among others.

“All these subjects — the individuals listed in the indictment had a nexus to Omaha,” said Eugene Kowel, Omaha FBI Special Agent in Charge. “It’s conduct that occurred in Omaha, the institutions and fraudulent schemes.”

Investigators don’t believe they’ll recover anything close to the $2.5 million lost in the alleged scheme to defraud. Upon conviction, the government did identify a number of assets that would be seized ranging from an Omaha home to a 2006 Bentley, a couple of dump trucks, a pickup, and $96,000 in cash.

Several defendants will make their initial appearance in federal court in Omaha on Thursday afternoon.

A conviction on the charge of Conspiracy to Commit Wire Fraud carries a maximum of 20 years in prison.

Copyright 2022 WOWT. All rights reserved.

Nebraska to test cable median barrier on I-80 west of Lincoln

A high tension cable barrier will be tested on a 20-mile stretch in the median of Interstate 80 west of Lincoln to see how well it reduces cross-over collisions."We have over 140 vehicles in the past five years that actually crossed our medians. In this particular corridor just west of Lincoln," said Nebraska Department of Transportation deputy director of engineering Khalil Jaber.He said half of those crashes resulted in injuries and five fatalities."And that's not acceptable," Jaber said.The ...

A high tension cable barrier will be tested on a 20-mile stretch in the median of Interstate 80 west of Lincoln to see how well it reduces cross-over collisions.

"We have over 140 vehicles in the past five years that actually crossed our medians. In this particular corridor just west of Lincoln," said Nebraska Department of Transportation deputy director of engineering Khalil Jaber.

He said half of those crashes resulted in injuries and five fatalities.

"And that's not acceptable," Jaber said.

The groundwork has already begun for the $10 million pilot project.

You can see an asphalt pad in the median of Interstate 80 from Pleasantdale to Utica. Holes will be drilled into the pad where the posts and cable will be installed. Jaber said the barrier is designed to give and catch the out-of-control vehicle and slow it down.

"Deflect these vehicles or redirect them if you will, so they don't cross the median completely," Jaber said.

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The cable barriers have been used in other states for years and along Highway 75 between Q Street and Chandler Road near Bellevue for over a decade.

"Nebraska is coming a little bit later in the game than other states because we do have wider medians," NDOT director John Selmer said.

Medians on I-80 in Nebraska range from 65 feet to 88 feet wide.

Selmer said higher traffic volumes and higher speeds have made them reconsider additional safety measures.

"Even this week in western Nebraska we had an incident where a vehicle went across," Selmer said.

He said a cable barrier in Iowa helped his son.

"Hit it at 55 mph during a snow event, him and his girlfriend and they were able to walk away, with no bruises or injuries. It prevented something very serious," Selmer said.

Jaber said engineers have already tried a number of other measures

"We've done all kinds of different things whether it's a pebbled edge, you know, trying to help cars recover quickly. We put rumble strips on the shoulders. We even put rumble strips that make you know some of those to wake up people and right in the center line," Jaber said.

He said the cable barrier is around $250,000 a mile which will be paid for with Highway Safety Funds.

"This project will paid for itself in a matter of a little over two years, just in terms of the saving to human lives to lessen the injuries," Jaber said.

But he said no matter what safety features they install the biggest factor will always be the person behind the wheel.

"This is why the Department is really focusing on a huge campaign. That's 'buckle up, phone down,'" Jaber said.

Jaber said most of the work will be done at night when there is less traffic.

The barrier should be fully installed by December.

Engineers will collect data on how effective the barriers are and determine whether to install them in other areas of I-80

Omaha chemical fire update: State agencies confirm no asbestos in debris

OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) - The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services confirmed Thursday that there was no asbestos present in the debris from the chemical fire that ignited earlier this week.DHHS said in a release Thursday evening that Nox-Crete had told state agencies that asbestos material had been removed from the facility in 1993. But officials with the Nebraska Department of Environment and Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency ordered testing of burn debris found more than a mile away from the facility “out o...

OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) - The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services confirmed Thursday that there was no asbestos present in the debris from the chemical fire that ignited earlier this week.

DHHS said in a release Thursday evening that Nox-Crete had told state agencies that asbestos material had been removed from the facility in 1993. But officials with the Nebraska Department of Environment and Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency ordered testing of burn debris found more than a mile away from the facility “out of an abundance of caution for residents in the surrounding area.”

NDEE received confirmation from DHHS that the debris had tested negative for asbestos late Thursday afternoon. In addition to alleviating local health concerns, the confirmation also allows residents to clear their yards of any debris and dispose of it with other sorts of trash.

Officials still recommend that residents in the area avoid mowing their lawns to avoid accidentally dispersing or crumbling the debris, which can be dampened to aid in disposal.

“Residents are advised to double-bag the debris before placing it in their outdoor trash receptacle,” the DHHS release states.

Also on Thursday, state officials were trying to figure out if chemicals are now in our soil.

As they work to answer those questions, local leaders are looking ahead to what can be done better in the future.

Omaha firefighters worked tirelessly to put out the Nox-Crete warehouse fire Monday night.

But chemicals inside pushed crews out of the building and changed the plan of attack.

“Fire doubles in size every 30 seconds anyway. Then add chemicals that are flammable on top of that, it just makes the fire, once it gets going take off that much faster,” said Scott Fitzpatrick, battalion chief.

OFD firefighters train often for a hazmat situation like this one.

And crews were familiar with this particular building, completing a thorough preplan and compliance check back in December of 2021.

“Local rigs that are in that area they kind of know ahead of time hey, this is what’s probably in this building. This is how I need to fight it if something happens, this is what we are thinking so they already have a game plan in their head before they even respond because they already know I know this building by driving by or doing a preplan or being inside walking around,” Fitzpatrick said.

OFD says they have records for 220 Tier II buildings in Omaha. That means those buildings have some sort of chemical inside and are required to tell the state and local fire departments about it.

While OFD continues to investigate what caused this particular fire, they are already coming up with ideas to help them better respond to a similar situation.

“Any big fire that we have. Any fire, really. We will do a brief little hot wash, hey what went right, what went wrong. This is no other. Once the fires get bigger we put it into a report for everybody on the entire job to see,” said Fitzpatrick.

One of the top things being looked at now? Communication with the public.

County Commissioner Roger Garcia says everyone involved from the state to the local level is working to help on that front.

“There’s different jurisdictions that have a different role but all of those jurisdictions will be coming together to reflect upon how did the response go and if there’s any opportunities for improvement for future emergencies,” said Roger Garcia, Douglas County Commissioner.

OFD officials say they haven’t responded to a chemical fire of this magnitude in a number of years so they will be putting together an internal lessons learned plan for every firefighter to have on hand.

Copyright 2022 WOWT. All rights reserved.

Omaha developer creates $150 million in affordable housing in Nebraska

OMAHA, Neb. —An Omaha developer is focused on thoughtful, affordable housing for senior citizens and single moms. Rob Woodling and Foundations Development recently unveiled 15 brand new 3-bedroom apartments for single mothers transitioning from the program at Omaha’s Bethlehem House.“It was a dream come true that Rob knocked on the door and said I’d like to build these income-based apartments here,” Bethleh...

OMAHA, Neb. —

An Omaha developer is focused on thoughtful, affordable housing for senior citizens and single moms. Rob Woodling and Foundations Development recently unveiled 15 brand new 3-bedroom apartments for single mothers transitioning from the program at Omaha’s Bethlehem House.

“It was a dream come true that Rob knocked on the door and said I’d like to build these income-based apartments here,” Bethlehem House Executive Director, TJ Ernst said.

The project, near 15th and Martha, also features affordable senior living apartments on the same campus. Woodling’s vision is that the two groups of tenants will work to form a supportive community using specially designed community rooms in each building.

“Some will have Bible study in the morning, some will have coffee. Each unit will take on its own personality with pot lucks, movie nights, things like that,” Woodling said.

Woodling has helped develop more than $150 million in affordable housing projects in the heartland in the last 13 years. He does it with the help of tax credits, special lenders and investors, all with the agreement that the property will remain affordable housing for 45 years.

Nelly Martinez lives in the apartment on the Bethlehem House campus paying $580 a month for a three- bedroom unit, which includes a washer and dryer. The program’s Aftercare office is housed in the same apartment, giving Martinez access to support, information and someone who understands her needs as a single mom.

“This is part of that extension of family and fellowship. I know that they are there for me no matter what I need. The Bethlehem House is my family,” said Martinez.

Hometown Tragedy: Missing in Milwaukee

Martinez learned about Bethlehem House while she was incarcerated and pregnant. She gave birth to Estella eight months ago, working through several programs and classes at the house to learn life skills, parenting, budgeting and more. Martinez recently transitioned from working in a restaurant to an office job and now she has a new apartment. With her rent savings, she plans to build a nest egg to buy a house someday.

“I love it. I am truly blessed for this opportunity,” Martinez said, who has also taken on the role as a Bethlehem House ambassador, sharing the story of the program.

Woodling is currently building 120 new units in the area, with 20 senior units in Ashland, more at 20th and Q in Omaha and rent to own homes in Wisner.

‘Enough is enough’: Nebraska medical organizations issue statement on hospital violence

In response, the Nebraska Hospital Association is taking extra measures to keep staff members and patients safe.OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) - The Nebraska Hospital Association and the Nebraska Medical Association have issued a joint statement on an increasing trend of violence in hospitals.The statement follows a recent string of mass shootings across the country, ...

In response, the Nebraska Hospital Association is taking extra measures to keep staff members and patients safe.

OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) - The Nebraska Hospital Association and the Nebraska Medical Association have issued a joint statement on an increasing trend of violence in hospitals.

The statement follows a recent string of mass shootings across the country, including one at a hospital campus in Oklahoma.

“We continue to grieve for our children and our healthcare heroes who have been impacted and traumatized by the most recent string of mass shooting events in the U.S.,” the statement read.

According to the Nebraska Hospital Association, the American Hospital Association recognizes June 3, 2022, as a national day of awareness to end violence in hospitals. The initiative called Hospitals Against Violence (HAV) aims to see best practices shared among hospitals for youth violence prevention, workplace violence prevention and the combatting of human trafficking.

“Gun violence continues to impact the lives of Americans nationwide and is becoming a true public health crisis,” the statement continued. “Mass shootings are happening all-too-often in public settings, including in our hospitals and medical offices – the very facilities whose mission is to help and heal.”

“In addition to these mass casualty events, our hospital and medical workers across the country have been seeing a steady increase in incidents of workplace violence. This week’s mass shooting at a Tulsa medical campus, unfortunately, did not come as a shock to many of our health care professionals.”

During a press conference Friday, the Nebraska Hospital Association welcomed nurses and other medical professionals to share their thoughts on the increasing trends of violence.

Topics that were addressed included a recent attitude shift from patients and families toward health care workers, violence directed at hospital staff, family violence in hospitals and security issues.

“The Nebraska Hospital Association and the Nebraska Medical Association along with its member hospitals and physicians are committed to doing more to prevent violent incidents both inside health care facilities and in our communities,” the statement continued. “We will continue to work with community partners to address root causes of violence, such as childhood trauma, and will continue shaping a medical culture that integrates behavioral and physical health care.”

“On behalf of our members, both the NHA and NMA will use our collective voices to call for changes such as commonsense, responsible gun violence prevention. Gun violence in our country is a true public health emergency that requires all of us to come together to put an end to the recent tragedies we’ve seen play out. Bottom line, we have seen enough carnage at our hospitals and clinics, whether from treating countless shooting victims or from caring for coworkers victimized by workplace violence.

“Enough is enough. The time is now for meaningful change.”

Copyright 2022 WOWT. All rights reserved.

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