Franchise Opportunities in San Antonio, TX

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Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in San Antonio, TX will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

Assistance-with-state-licensing

Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News in San Antonio, TX

Why San Antonians should stay up late to watch Sunday night's total lunar eclipse

SAN ANTONIO — San Antonians got a great view of a total lunar eclipse on Sunday night, turning the moon red!Viewers from across the area sent in photos of the rare celestial event.There are three different types of lunar eclipses. Back in November, San Antonians had the chance to experience a partial lunar eclipse, but cloud cover obstructed some views. On Sunday night, a full lunar eclipse is expected, and skies should be mostly clear in San Antonio around the time of maximum eclipse.One forecast model indicates s...

SAN ANTONIO — San Antonians got a great view of a total lunar eclipse on Sunday night, turning the moon red!

Viewers from across the area sent in photos of the rare celestial event.

There are three different types of lunar eclipses. Back in November, San Antonians had the chance to experience a partial lunar eclipse, but cloud cover obstructed some views. On Sunday night, a full lunar eclipse is expected, and skies should be mostly clear in San Antonio around the time of maximum eclipse.

One forecast model indicates some clouds Sunday evening; however, the closer we get to maximum eclipse time around 11:11 p.m., the more clearing we expect to see.

Therefore, if you see clouds early, don't get discouraged, because the total lunar eclipse will continue until near midnight. In fact, you can continue watching the moon emerge from its shadow through early Monday morning around 1 a.m.

During a full lunar eclipse, the Earth blocks sunlight from the moon, casting a shadow across the lunar surface. According to TimeandDate.com, at 9:27 p.m., the partial eclipse will begin leaving a crescent shape of the moon glowing. The total lunar eclipse begins at 10:29 p.m. Sunday, turning the moon reddish-orange until it ends at 11:53 p.m.

The color change is caused by longer wavelengths, like red, that are bent and refracted around the Earth's atmosphere. The red light reflecting off the moon's surface gives a red appearance, earning the name "blood moon." Other factors such as dust and other particles present in the Earth's atmosphere can also change the moon's appearance.

No, the lunar eclipse is visible to the naked eye. However, if you have binoculars or telescopes, you could see the event up close. Luckily for San Antonians, the San Antonio League of Sidewalk Astronomers (SALSA) is bringing their telescopes for the public to use Sunday night.

The local organization will hold a lunar eclipse watching party in the field next to the dog park area at McAllister Park beginning at 8 p.m., weather permitting. This will be a fun experience for the whole family where the group allows attendees to take turns looking through a telescope to see the moon up close.

If you miss the this lunar eclipse, another chance will occur on Nov. 8, according to space.com.

7 fantastic places to camp in and near San Antonio

This is a carousel. Use Next and Previous buttons to navigateCamping in San Antonio? The Texas city may be the seventh most populated city in America, but there’s no shortage of spectacular state parks and ...

This is a carousel. Use Next and Previous buttons to navigate

Camping in San Antonio? The Texas city may be the seventh most populated city in America, but there’s no shortage of spectacular state parks and preserves in the city proper or a short drive away that make ideal stomping grounds for your next camping in Texas adventure.

Whether your dream camping outing involves fishing for Largemouth and Guadalupe bass (hello, Blanco State Park) or scoping out prehistoric dinosaur tracks (Government Canyon State Natural Area, here we come), we’ve got something for you.

Read on to discover seven fantastic places to go camping in San Antonio. But just remember, advance overnight reservations are recommended for every state park at all times.

Government Canyon State Natural Area (San Antonio)

An easy 30-minute drive from downtown San Antonio, 12,000 acres of wilderness is yours for the taking with some 40 miles of hiking and biking trails, all for a $6 entrance fee per person. (The park safeguards Alamo City’s drinking water.)

One highlight not to be missed comes along the Johnston Route to the 19th century Zizelmann House, where you’ll see 110-million-year-old dinosaur tracks, believed to belong to Acrocanthosaurus and Sauroposeidon dinosaurs. When you’re ready to rest your tired self, choose from two campsite options, campsites with water ($18 nightly plus the entrance fee) for a total of eight people per site and group camps ($40 nightly plus the entrance fee) for a total of 16 people per site.

Find it: 12861 Galm Road, San Antonio, TX 78254

Medina River Natural Area (San Antonio)

Another quick jaunt from downtown, if you’re looking for camping in San Antonio, head 20 minutes South of the city center for this admission-free gem. The diverse terrain and slew of different wildlife makes these grounds a popular hub for locals looking to hike and bike.

When you’re done tackling the seven miles of trails with interpretive features to mark the El Camino Real wagon trail, set up shop tent camping at the campsite which holds up to 25 people ($20 per night). You can make a reservation up to a year in advance by calling 210-207-7275 or online here. Along with six tent pads, the campsite also has a pavilion with two picnic tables, vault toilets, a roomy barbecue pit and potable water.

Find it: 5800 Old Highway 90, San Antonio, TX 78227

Guadalupe River State Park (Spring Branch)

Located 45 minutes north of downtown San Antonio, many flock to the picturesque Guadalupe River State Park to swim, but the park itself also boasts plenty of stunning vistas, and colorful history, to boot.

Perched on four miles of river frontage, you can take a whirl at fishing, tubing and canoeing if you’re all swimmed out or take to the land for hiking, birdwatching, cycling or horseback riding. A picnic is always an excellent idea, too. The entrance fee is $7 per person and camping options include a campsite with electricity for a total of eight people per site ranging from $15 to $24 nightly or $90 to $144 weekly plus the daily entrance fee (more details here). Book your reservation in advance.

Find it: 3350 Park Road 31, Spring Branch, TX 78070

Hill Country State Natural Area (Bandera)

This peaceful nature preserve is located an hour and 15 minutes northwest of downtown San Antonio and costs $6 per person to enter. Backpackers can enjoy 5,000 acres of canyons, plateaus and creek bottoms before setting up shop at primitive campsites from $5 to $12 a night plus the daily entrance fee. Or, stay at the Group Lodge, a 1930s ranch house that sleeps up to 12 for $300 per night per group plus individual entrance fees.

Worth noting: the sprawling grounds are the site of a former ranch, and there are trails galore for hiking, mountain biking and horseback riding. If you’re up for a steep climb, venture on the West Peak Overlook Trail, which proffers sweeping views of Hill Country.

Find it: 10600 Bandera Creek Road, Bandera, TX 78003

John William Helton - San Antonio River Nature Park (Floresville)

Lose yourself amongst giant pecan trees, a meandering river and three miles of hiking (or biking) trails at this admission-free park 30 minutes south of downtown San Antonio.

For larger gatherings and celebrations, the park has a 5,000-square foot pavilion for rent. Choose from river and paddle trail access if you want to take your adventures to the water or three miles of well-kept trails for hiking or mountain biking in this 98-acre city escape. Like shooting hoops? There’s a basketball court, too. The park has campgrounds with a maximum occupancy of eight people for a $10 overnight fee.

Find it: 15662 FM 775, Floresville, TX 78114

Blanco State Park (Blanco)

An hour north of downtown San Antonio, a $5 entrance fee gets you access to the banks of the spring-fed Blanco River, perfect for a picnic, dip in the water and fishing excursion. While it’s only a mile-long stretch of river, the park packs much aquatic action, from bass fishing to kayaking or canoeing. You can also partake in history and nature-focused ranger programs.

Bring those s’mores victuals as you stargaze at the campsites with electricity for a total of eight people ($20 nightly plus the daily entrance fee), full hookup campsites (30-amp) for a total of eight people ($23 nightly plus the daily entrance fee) and premium full hookup campsites (30/50-amp) for a total of eight people ($25 nightly plus the daily entrance fee). There are also screened shelters for a total of eight people per site ($30 nightly plus the daily entrance fee) available.

Find it: 101 Park Road 23, Blanco, TX 78606

San Antonio / Alamo KOA Holiday (San Antonio)

For fans of Kampgrounds of America (KOA) camping in Texas, you’ll be pleased to learn the privately-owned company has an outpost 10 minutes from downtown San Antonio. An on-site swimming pool, playground, stocked fishing pond for catch-and-release fun and Howard W. Peak Greenway Trail System are available for guest use along with pedal cart and bike rentals.

Camping options run the gamut from RV sites and tent sites to 1-room cabins, 2-room cabins and deluxe cabins. Prices vary based on travel dates, type of equipment and size.

Find it: 602 Gembler Road, San Antonio, TX 78219

- Let Guadalupe River State Park woo you with its lush evergreen trails

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Meet the Mermaids (Yes, Mermaids) at a San Antonio Aquarium

In the Texas Monthly Recommends series, Texas Monthly writers, editors, photographers, and producers offer up their favorite recent culture discoveries from the great state of Texas.A few years ago, my now-eight-year-old daughter started writing fiction books. She’d bring me a stack of printer paper and ask me to staple in a binding, then set off filling the pages with backward all-lowercase letters and (qui...

In the Texas Monthly Recommends series, Texas Monthly writers, editors, photographers, and producers offer up their favorite recent culture discoveries from the great state of Texas.

A few years ago, my now-eight-year-old daughter started writing fiction books. She’d bring me a stack of printer paper and ask me to staple in a binding, then set off filling the pages with backward all-lowercase letters and (quite impressive, in my opinion) illustrations. The COVID-19 pandemic—resulting in remote kindergarten and an abrupt end to extracurriculars—accelerated her pace, and over the months, I noticed a trend. Her protagonists of choice tended to be mermaids: enchanted-stranger mermaids, mermaids that granted wishes, brother-sister mermaids adventuring away from home (big pandemic feels). One of her stories evolved into a series, and then a full-scale—read: backyard—production, in which she cast her two younger siblings, called “Mermaids of the Lost.”

This weekend, my little prodigy (and yours!) may just get to meet her muse, as Sea Life San Antonio hosts diving shows and meet and greets with mermaids. Mermaids will dive into the aquarium’s 160,000-gallon “ocean tunnel,” interacting with kids by high-fiving, blowing bubbles, and giving “hugs” through the glass, according to Sea Life staff. For the next two weekends, May 6–8 and May 13–15, guests can see the mermaids swim among the sea life—sharks, rays, and sea turtles included—and then take a photo with them on dry land. Performances are 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. Meet and greets run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Both are included with the cost of admission, which starts at $25.99 on these weekends.

—Sandi Villarreal, deputy editor, digital

Whisper the word “tacos,” and Texans clamor and gather. They’ve done that in greater numbers each year at Taco Fest: Music y Más, another reason to visit San Antonio. Perhaps that is because tacos are the perfect dish for food festivals—they gained early popularity at puestos, or street stands.

Puestos will abound at this year’s Taco Fest, the biggest yet, which will showcase the best of San Antonio tacos and beyond. The grand taquiza (taco party) kicks off at noon on May 14 at Travis Park and goes until 11 p.m. That’s a lot of tacos! Local favorites, such as Chela’s Tacos and Carnitas Don Raúl, will be serving alongside newcomers and low-key operations, such as Ay Que Rico, Stixs & Stone, and Mi Frijoles Catering.

Armando “Mando” Vera of Vera’s Backyard Bar-B-Que in Brownsville will make a rare appearance outside of the Rio Grande Valley. Vera, the owner of the only Texas restaurant permitted to pit cook barbacoa de cabeza, will be giving a cooking demo on one of the stages set up for entertainment (both culinary and musical). Of course, no Alamo City taco festival would be complete without a contentious panel debating the merits of and the rivalry between Austin and San Antonio tacos.

Early-bird general admission is $20, while VIP access (which includes taco and drink tickets and complimentary chips and salsa) costs $70. Children ten and under enter for free. Best of all, every vendor has committed to selling at least one two-dollar taco. Tickets are available at tacocapitaloftheworld.com.

José R. Ralat, taco editor

Mother’s Day is just around the corner, and Chappell Hill Lavender Farm, located about thirteen miles northeast of Brenham, is celebrating moms with a Saturday spring fling. Starting at 9 a.m., the farm will be dotted with vendors, flower pounding, plants for sale, a food truck, and even a painting class (from 10 a.m. to noon) for the entire family to enjoy. Grab a glass of lavender lemonade and spend the day exploring farm’s two dozen acres—be sure to check out the pond and gazebo—while enjoying the aromatic lavender all around you.

If you can’t make it this weekend, don’t worry. The farm is open to the public until November. You still have months to pile your family and friends into the car, drive out to Chappell Hill, and pick your own lavender bouquets. To complete the trip, make a stop at the original Blue Bell Creameries, where, in my humble opinion, you’ll find the best ice cream in Texas.

Jacqueline Knox, editorial intern

6 Unique Stops On A Road Trip From San Antonio To Marfa, Texas

All products featured on TravelAwaits are independently selected by our writers and editors. We may earn commission when you click on or make a purchase via our links.The southern route across Texas is U.S. 90. It takes you from San Antonio in the east to Van Horn in the west. Over the course of 400 miles, the terrain changes, the weather changes, and it is a great way to experience “old Texas” before Interstate 10 became the preferred travel route.Traversing U.S. 90 is a great driving trip with plenty to see and do...

All products featured on TravelAwaits are independently selected by our writers and editors. We may earn commission when you click on or make a purchase via our links.

The southern route across Texas is U.S. 90. It takes you from San Antonio in the east to Van Horn in the west. Over the course of 400 miles, the terrain changes, the weather changes, and it is a great way to experience “old Texas” before Interstate 10 became the preferred travel route.

Traversing U.S. 90 is a great driving trip with plenty to see and do along the way. The best times to go are spring and fall. Winter will be cold and possibly snowy in the higher elevations of the west. Summer is very hot in the lower elevations — but in the mid-80s in the western towns with cool nights.

There are plenty of unique stops on this route, from “God’s Country” in the east to high-elevation railroad towns in the west. Welcome to southern Texas!

1. The Gateway Town: Hondo

“This is God’s Country” is the Hondo town slogan, made famous by a billboard that asked people to slow “the hell” down as they entered the town. The slogan has stuck and gives a flavor to this historic town 40 miles west of San Antonio.

Hondo was made famous in part by the Louis L’Amour novel of the same name and the film adaptation starring John Wayne. The railroad came through in 1881 and continues to dominate the landscape of this town. There is a Medina County Museum in the old railroad depot, and the main street through town has been preserved, showing the 1901 Hondo National Bank building.

Tripadvisor gives a thumbs up to Heavy’s Barbecue, which offers traditional Texas fare in a rustic setting.

Pro Tip: It’s two hours from Hondo to the next major stop. Watch your fuel tank and your water. You’re heading into the desert.

2. Amistad National Recreation Area

Desert and an increasing elevation accompany your arrival into Del Rio. Most people who live here are linked to Border Patrol, Laughlin Air Force Base, or the border crossing to Ciudad Acuña in Mexico. Many retirees fill out the population.

The real jewel of the area is the Amistad National Recreation Area, 8 miles west of the city. Amistad, a word meaning “friendship” in Spanish, is a reservoir formed by a dam on the Rio Grande as it curves between the United States and Mexico. Boating, some hiking, swimming, and fishing are enjoyed here.

The campgrounds are no frills and do not take reservations but are worth the effort to camp there. The reservoir water is incredibly beautiful, and the white limestone rocks are a stark contrast, adding to the geographical brilliance. You can watch military jets fly low and land at the Air Force base, right from U.S. 90. There are plenty of Mex and Tex local restaurants on both sides of the border, as well as most chain eateries.

There are paved roads in the campgrounds and day-use area, but otherwise, this is not a wheelchair-accessible location.

Pro Tip: Take the Texas 79 loop around the city for nice views of the desert and Mexican mountains, and to avoid the endless stop-and-go traffic in town.

3. Seminole Canyon State Park

This small state park is 30 minutes from Del Rio. Seminole Canyon is mainly a walking and biking park, with 10 miles of trails. The canyon is small but includes two sections of petroglyphs made by people 7,000 years ago. One panel is accessible only by a park ranger walking tour, which has moderate stairs down into the canyon (and back up) as well as a moderate hike to the site. The other petroglyph site is only accessible by private tour boat and includes walking to the site after landing on the shore.

Pro Tips: As you head west, you’ll cross the historic Pecos River. There is a visitor parking area and pullouts near the bridge. Also note that to get to the railroad towns, you will ascend to over 4,500 feet to the high plain. Expect headwinds going west, which may require extra fuel.

4. Marathon

Marathon, the first of the railroad towns on this list, is 2 hours west of Seminole Canyon park and is a hidden gem of a place.

Marathon considers itself to be the start of the western frontier. The historic, adobe Gage Hotel is the primary attraction in this tiny town and includes a gourmet restaurant in the hotel and the Brick Vault Brewery and Barbecue across the street. The Brick is very casual and has good food and craft brews.

The Gage also maintains a 27-acre garden in town that is open and free to the public every day. It has an off-leash dog area and a putting green, which was a totally random find.

For me, however, the main attraction is Marathon’s starry skies. The Marathon Motel & RV Park and Marathon Sky Park are under a Class 1 dark sky, which is the darkest classification on the Boris Light Pollution Scale. Countless stars and fascinating space phenomena are visible. The parks have an observatory and astronomers who help visitors see the various constellations. On the cold night I was there, 20 of us peered through telescopic binoculars, oohing and ahhing at the planets and stars. It was a lot of fun for free.

The daytime views in Marathon are stunning, as well, and the trains, including Amtrak, come through frequently.

5. Alpine

Alpine is the next railroad town and is 30 minutes away. It is the largest of the railroad towns and sits at 4,500 feet. This town has plenty of services, hotels, and most importantly, gas. There is a museum in town, some historic buildings, and local eateries. I passed through, as Marfa was my main destination.

Pro Tip: There are two very convenient picnic stops between the three cities. They are easy on/off stops with covered picnic areas. Any rest stop in Texas allows for a 24 overnight stay for free.

6. Marfa

The next railroad town, Marfa, is a quirky place and is worth the time to explore. It’s pretty much at the end of the road going west — go south to get to Big Bend national and state parks, or go north to Van Horn and El Paso.

As an end-of-the-line town, Marfa has taken on a mystique. It has a lot of art galleries, artists in residence, and a great deal of art for sale in shops. Many artists are celebrated, and you’ll find some outdoor sculptures, as well.

Ballroom Marfa is a major art gallery and performative art center in town. You’ll also find the sprawling complex of the famous artist Donald Judd. He has a studio, home, and gallery downtown, set in repurposed historic buildings and new galleries.

There is a lovely courthouse square flanked by historic buildings, including the national historic landmark The Paisano Hotel. The 1956 Western Giant was filmed nearby, and the cast, including James Dean and Elizabeth Taylor, stayed at The Paisano.

There are a dozen cool cafes and restaurants along with food trucks for dining. One of the places I tried to visit is Food Shark, a food truck. Sadly, a handwritten note was taped to a folding chair at the entrance of the property that read, “Closed until not.” That sums up the nature of Marfa. It’s a fun town to wander around and enjoy the ambiance. You’ll even find the local public radio station housed in a new building that looks like a repurposed 1930s gas station. It fits right into the local culture.

Pro Tip: Cafes and small restaurants may only be open on the weekends during the colder seasons.

Besides art, Marfa is known for the sporadic and unexplained lights in its night sky, the Marfa Lights. There’s a viewing pavilion and rest stop built for you to catch a glimpse (if you’re lucky). Head east of town about five miles on U.S. 90, and you’ll find plenty of people each night sitting or standing in the dark, gazing at the horizon. The area is a decommissioned World War II airbase that allows great sightlines for viewing these seemingly unexplainable lights.

I enjoyed my stay in town at the cheekily named Marfa Yacht Club. You can rent one of their classic Airstream trailers for your visit or bring your own, as I did! It sits in the midst of the valley with great views of the mountains.

It’s windy and dusty on the high plain. It can be hot in the summer, and winter nights get below freezing. But the Guadalupe Mountains to the north and the Texas Chinati Mountains far to the south create a beautiful landscape vista in Marathon, Alpine, and Marfa.

Bonus: Valentine

Venture north of Marfa to the town of Valentine to see the unique outdoor sculpture, the Prada Marfa Boutique. There is nothing else open in this town, but this attraction draws a crowd. The Prada “store” was commissioned by Ballroom Marfa in 2005 and is a replica of an actual Prada store, right down to its authentic merchandise. This eclectic piece was a busy stop on the side of the road the weekday morning I visited.

End Of The Road

U.S. 90 ends 30 minutes up the road in Van Horn, where you can catch I-10 to go to El Paso or San Antonio.

This road trip is rich in history, from prehistoric times to ranchers and railroads. Sadly, there is little attention given to Native American history in the area. Historical markers note battles with Mexico and the advent of “settlers.” The local museums celebrate the taming of the land and the advent of railroads, along with noting the colorful tales of bank robbers and Wild West outlaws. The scenery is worth the trip, though, as are visits to the towns and natural settings that are authentic and quirky.

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Keep it cool in the Texas heat at these swimming, splashing spots in San Antonio and surrounding areas

Summer, summer, summertime - time to sit back and unwindSAN ANTONIO – I’m just trying to keep it cool.May has been super hot — like record-breaking hot. My buddy Justin Horne said San Antonio’s hot streak could potentially lead to the hottest May in the history of the city.If you’ve been a subscriber to the ...

Summer, summer, summertime - time to sit back and unwind

SAN ANTONIO – I’m just trying to keep it cool.

May has been super hot — like record-breaking hot. My buddy Justin Horne said San Antonio’s hot streak could potentially lead to the hottest May in the history of the city.

If you’ve been a subscriber to the newsletter for a while (thank you) you’ll know I prefer cooler temperatures. So now that it’s absolutely roasting outside, I’ve been brainstorming some ways to cool off.

I compiled a list of rivers, lakes, swimming holes and splash pads to help you find some options if you feel like heading outside. Some of the locations are free, some cost money and some require reservations so keep an eye out for that when you’re making plans.

Reading this as an article? You’re missing out. Newsletter subscribers already had access to it!

Find events, festivals and hidden gems in San Antonio and surrounding areas in our free, bimonthly Things To Do Newsletter.

Rivers and Swimming Holes

San Antonio and the surrounding areas, including parts of the Texas Hill Country, are full of places to take a dip when the weather is hot. The places on this list are definitely not all-encompassing for the state of Texas but they’re within driving distance of San Antonio.

I’ve been to a decent amount of places on this list but still have a couple I’d like to check out. Also — I know Hamilton Pool is popular but it’s still closed for swimming due to falling rocks.

Splash Pads

All the splash pads on this list are free to visit. Splash pads, sometimes referred to as spray grounds, are recreation areas with non-slip surfaces that have a number of fountains and nozzles that shoot water but leave little to no standing water.

Hopefully you found a few places on the list you haven’t tried out yet. I’m a big fan of sunscreen too — SPF 50 at least.

Mary Claire Patton, Digital Journalist

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