Franchise Opportunities in San Diego, CA

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Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in San Diego, CA will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

Assistance-with-state-licensing

Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News Near Me San Diego, CA

Column: Padres wisely walk away from troubled former Dodgers pitcher Trevor Bauer

Player who faced longest suspension in the history of MLB’s domestic abuse, sexual assault policy still hunting for a teamStop the Trevor Bauer-Padres talk, whatever there is of it, right now. It’s not happening. It was not close to happening. Paint it as an unshakable non-starter at Petco Park.The Padres want to win a World Series, possibly as much as anyone in baseball. The organization and principal owner ...

Player who faced longest suspension in the history of MLB’s domestic abuse, sexual assault policy still hunting for a team

Stop the Trevor Bauer-Padres talk, whatever there is of it, right now. It’s not happening. It was not close to happening. Paint it as an unshakable non-starter at Petco Park.

The Padres want to win a World Series, possibly as much as anyone in baseball. The organization and principal owner Peter Seider have proven that in dollars and ink for seasons and offseasons on end.

The Padres need another starting pitcher. You can never have too many in this game, as October routinely reminds. A parade-chasing window could be closing with free agency looming for Yu Darvish and Blake Snell, along with a player option on the table in 2024 for Seth Lugo.

Grab a pitcher, by all means. Not that pitcher, though.

There’s no doubt Bauer seems tempting, on paper. He’s a Cy Young winner who led baseball in ERA+ and fewest hits allowed per nine innings in pandemic-shortened 2020. He’s No. 24 in career wins above replacement among active pitchers.

And none of that matters … or at least it shouldn’t.

Character reveals itself most clearly and genuinely when decisions are toughest and the most is at stake. Bauer could absolutely change the trajectory of the NL West for the Padres and Dodgers, who recently sent the elite arm packing after his suspension for violating Major League Baseball’s domestic violence and sexual assault policy.

Bauer denied all allegations and appealed his suspension.

Read into the Dodgers statement when they announced Bauer’s release, however: They pointed out that although the 324-game suspension was reduced to 194 on appeal, investigations by Commissioner Rob Manfred’s office and an arbitrator “concluded that Mr. Bauer’s actions warranted the longest ever active player suspension in our sport for violations of this policy.”

Yes, Bauer was not charged. There’s no doubt about the message behind the Dodgers statement, though, regarding situations reportedly involving at least three women. There’s too much smoke. There are too many believable reasons for fire.

If the Padres offered a landing spot for Bauer, some competitive deliciousness would have been stirred in. The pitcher easily could have been the tipping point in terms of putting the Dodgers in the rearview mirror again, with the rivals paying $22.5 million in freight.

You wouldn’t just be welcoming a pitcher, though. You’d be bracing for a distracting and unrelenting circus of epic proportions, particularly when playing the Dodgers. Baseball would take a back seat.

Bauer might love the opportunity to shut down the team that walked away from him. The Padres, however, embrace the organizational model “best in class.” They talk about it all the time. They line up behind it.

You can’t claim that if you are not willing to live it.

Bringing in Bauer would not just say the Padres are trying to win, but shout that they are trying to win at all costs — no matter the ethical shrapnel. Do the Padres really want to hand deliver the moral high ground to the Dodgers? You can hear it now, “We did not dirty our hands. We did it the right way. The Padres? Well …”

The woman at center of the allegations is from San Diego, the Padres’ own backyard. Whatever you believe or wherever you stand on Bauer, handing him a uniform would be interpreted by many as de facto victim blaming or outright dismissal.

There are plenty of fans — in San Diego and Los Angeles — who want Bauer in uniform, regardless of the ugly details and public-relations fallout. There also are many who understand the bigger picture amid the sordidness.

As one fan tweeted: “I would cancel my season tickets if the Padres sign Bauer.” Another: “I’d rather lose without Bauer than win with him.”

Some in the Padres clubhouse might welcome Bauer if foisted upon them, but many would not privately. The current group has built the best vibe and glue since, well, it’s hard to know when. Lobbing a grenade in the middle of it constitutes real risk.

The Padres will save their players from that. Actions speak louder than words. In this case, inaction speaks volumes.

There’s too much baggage and too many concerning and unanswered questions. Adding talent for talent’s sake, despite the alarming and troublesome trimmings, would dilute and damage the sleeve-rolling work it took to build the current roster.

The Padres will decided to make this offseason about the addition of star shortstop Xander Bogaerts, not tossing the NLCS progress into a Bauer-chasing blender.

Win the World Series with Manny Machado, the guy who plays and plays and plays, through an ankle bruised technicolor. Win with Joe Musgrove, the hometown gem with integrity oozing from every pore. Win because of the guts of Jake Cronenworth and the uber-talent of Juan Soto.

Just don’t try to win with Bauer.

Cap tip to the Padres for understanding that from the start.

News Analysis: No high-priced help is coming. Why the Dodgers are betting on themselves

By not taking a gamble on any of this offseason’s top free agents, the Dodgers instead placed one very big, very high-stakes bet on something else.Themselves.That’s perhaps the best way to summarize the club’s winter activity, in which the Dodgers made themselves an outlier among Major League Baseball’s large-market teams by not making any large-scale investments.Almost unanimously, the sport’s other biggest...

By not taking a gamble on any of this offseason’s top free agents, the Dodgers instead placed one very big, very high-stakes bet on something else.

Themselves.

That’s perhaps the best way to summarize the club’s winter activity, in which the Dodgers made themselves an outlier among Major League Baseball’s large-market teams by not making any large-scale investments.

Almost unanimously, the sport’s other biggest contenders decided that the length and cost and risk of mega-deals was all worth it — that heavy spending is simply what it takes to compete in the majors’ current landscape.

The New York Yankees retained Aaron Judge and added Carlos Rodón.

The San Diego Padres (who signed Xander Bogaerts), Philadelphia Phillies (who signed Trea Turner) and Atlanta Braves (who traded for and then extended Sean Murphy) all spent their way into the league’s luxury tax.

Then there are the New York Mets, who were already headed toward a league-record payroll with the additions of Justin Verlander and Kodai Senga even before reportedly agreeing to a massive deal with Carlos Correa.

The Dodgers, on the other hand, zagged in a different direction.

They spent lightly in free agency, acquiring a string of less expensive veterans on one-year deals. They sat out many of the winter’s most lucrative bidding wars, and came up empty-handed on a few others they did pursue.

Their offseason approach was no doubt influenced by the uncertainty surrounding Trevor Bauer’s status. The Dodgers did not learn until Dec. 22 that the pitcher would be reinstated for the 2023 season following a reduction to his domestic violence suspension and owed $22.5 million in salary. On Friday, they designated Bauer for assignment. They have until Thursday to trade or release him.

Even before Friday’s news, the Dodgers’ reticence to pay premium prices on any of their biggest needs — they have dropped from first to fifth in the majors in payroll, and currently straddle just below MLB’s $233-million luxury tax threshold — signaled an unwavering trust in their core organizational beliefs.

Preserving financial flexibility for the long-term future.

Extracting value from overlooked veterans and highly touted prospects.

And betting that their coaching staff and scouting department, analytics-minded front office and calculated approach to roster construction will continue to keep them in the championship picture — even after an offseason that has seen less addition than subtraction.

An important inflection point in this Dodgers offseason came right at the start of the winter meetings in San Diego.

The club had already freed up plenty of money by then, clearing more than $100 million by cutting ties with Justin Turner, Cody Bellinger and eight other out-of-contract free agents who didn’t re-sign in Los Angeles.

After leading the league in payroll the previous three seasons (and paying luxury tax penalties the last two), the Dodgers were keen on getting back to what they deemed were more sustainable levels of spending.

They weren’t unwilling to make a major acquisition, or even again cross MLB’s luxury tax line.

It just had to be under the right circumstances.

In that vein, one splashy addition almost did materialize — the soon-to-be 40-year-old Verlander became one of the Dodgers’ prime targets, a reigning Cy Young Award winner who fit their preference for a shorter-term, high-value contract. The Dodgers presented a two-year, $80-million contract offer.

While the proposal included significant deferrals, it still would have pushed the Dodgers over the luxury tax line — no small matter with the club facing at least a 50% tax rate this year as a repeat offender — and given them an impact addition on par with the league’s other biggest moves this offseason.

Verlander opted to instead sign in New York, accepting a two-year, $86.66-million deal from the Mets with an option for a third season before the Dodgers could present any further counter proposals, according to people with knowledge of the situation.

The Dodgers shifted their focus to lower-cost veterans with potentially untapped upside while largely sitting out the sweepstakes for more established (and expensive) free-agent stars.

For most of Andrew Friedman’s tenure as the club’s president of baseball operations, this is how the Dodgers have operated.

They’ll flex their financial muscle on deals they believe to be worth the value, but rarely expand their financial strike zone beyond what they deem a deal to be worth.

In recent offseasons, that has meant hanging around “the backboard,” as Friedman likes to say, in hopes of scooping up a loose superstar on the rebound.

Sometimes it works, such as their blockbuster trade and extension for Mookie Betts in 2020, or the shock signing of Freddie Freeman after the league’s lockout last spring. Sometimes it doesn’t, such as when the Dodgers missed out on Bryce Harper in 2018 and Gerrit Cole in 2019.

But for a club that prioritizes “sustained success” — another Friedman principle — and considers multi-year outlooks when constructing its roster and payroll, it has become the default course of action.

This winter proved no different.

While Rodón and Jacob deGrom got nine-figure guarantees, the Dodgers filled out their pitching staff with Noah Syndergaard and Shelby Miller (they were also heavily linked with Seth Lugo).

While Trea Turner, Bogaerts and Correa secured long-term deals, the Dodgers added J.D. Martinez on a one-year deal, and Jason Heyward and Steven Duggar on minor league contracts (they also made a strong push for Kevin Kiermaier).

The team never completely abandoned the thought of another marquee signing. With Dansby Swanson, for example, they positioned themselves as a shorter-term alternative for the All-Star shortstop in case he didn’t get the mega-deal he was seeking. Swanson eventually agreed to a seven-year contract with the Chicago Cubs before the holidays.

But in the end, the Dodgers effectively decided to double-down on themselves, bypassing the very top of the free-agent market with the belief they could contend in 2023 in other, less expensive ways.

While Dodgers fans were waiting on a major signing that never came, the front office was waiting on a major ruling regarding Bauer’s 324-game domestic violence suspension.

For all of last season, the pitcher’s fate lingered in the background, his future clouded by an appeal to an independent arbitrator that took seven months to play out.

If upheld, Bauer’s suspension would have covered the remainder of his contract with the Dodgers and absolved them of his $32-million salary for 2023.

If reversed, it would have not only put Bauer back on the Dodgers’ books, but potentially forced them to retroactively pay additional luxury taxes for their 2022 payroll.

Whatever temptations the team had about joining fellow World Series contenders and splurging on a top free-agent target, the uncertainty of Bauer’s situation helped stamp that out.

The final ruling was neither a best- or worst-case scenario for the Dodgers.

Bauer’s reduced pay of $22.5 million, though, still provided a pathway for the Dodgers to either stay under the luxury tax, or at least assure themselves of a small tax bill that could preserve more financial flexibility for the future — thus making potential pursuits of future free agents, such as Shohei Ohtani, more viable in their long-term plans.

Where it all leaves the Dodgers in 2023 is far less clear.

Their cautiously calculated approach might not have been out of the norm, especially as they awaited an answer on Bauer. But this year, it was thrust into contrast with the big spending that took place around the league.

As other teams made big-money moves for marked roster improvements, the Dodgers currently look less talented on paper than the team that racked up a franchise-record 111 wins last season.

Trea Turner is gone, and though the club is confident in Gavin Lux taking over at shortstop, no one has arrived to replace Trea Turner’s bat at the top of the lineup.

Clayton Kershaw was retained, but Tyler Anderson’s departure still leaves an All-Star-sized hole in the rotation.

Center field also remains unsettled in Bellinger’s absence. And even the de facto swap of Justin Turner (who signed with the Red Sox) for Martinez (who left the Red Sox to sign with the Dodgers) is no guaranteed upgrade, especially when factoring in Justin Turner’s role as a long-time leader in the clubhouse.

Dodgers brass sees other ways to fill those gaps.

The club is eager to integrate a new wave of prospect talent, with infielder Miguel Vargas, outfielder James Outman, and pitchers Gavin Stone, Ryan Pepiot and Bobby Miller all appearing likely to get big league opportunities at some point next season.

They also have time to keep exploring the trade market, where anyone from shortstop Willy Adames of the Milwaukee Brewers (whom the Dodgers like) to starting pitcher Pablo Lopéz of the Miami Marlins (whom the Dodgers had interest in last year) to outfielder Bryan Reynolds of the Pittsburgh Pirates (who has already requested to be dealt) could be moved before the midseason deadline.

The core of the roster — with Kershaw and Julio Urías anchoring the rotation, and Freeman and Betts headlining the lineup — remains among the most talented in the majors.

But after a winter in which they had ample payroll space, critical roster needs, and yet failed to land any number of the top free agents, the Dodgers’ lack of splashy offseason activity is shaping to be a gamble of self-belief.

They can only hope it pays off..

Padres add depth with RHP Honeywell, OF Engel

SAN DIEGO -- Pitching and outfield depth were the Padres' top two priorities at this juncture of the offseason, and they took a step toward bolstering both areas on Friday, signing right-hander Brent Honeywell Jr. and outfielder Adam Engel to contracts for the 2023 season.Honeywell's contract is a Major League deal, but he retains Minor Leagu...

SAN DIEGO -- Pitching and outfield depth were the Padres' top two priorities at this juncture of the offseason, and they took a step toward bolstering both areas on Friday, signing right-hander Brent Honeywell Jr. and outfielder Adam Engel to contracts for the 2023 season.

Honeywell's contract is a Major League deal, but he retains Minor League options. The split deal will pay the 27-year-old Honeywell $725,000 in the Majors and $200,000 if he were in the Minors. Engel, meanwhile, is on a big league contract and with five years of accrued service time, he can decline any options.

Both Honeywell and Engel are expected to compete for roster spots, with Engel likely slotted for a backup outfield role and Honeywell vying for a place at the back of the rotation or as a swing-man type in the bullpen.

The 31-year-old Engel spent the first six seasons of his MLB career with the White Sox, who picked him in the 19th round of the 2013 Draft. A speedster who has proven to be a strong defensive center fielder, Engel has been somewhat inconsistent at the plate. But he has also shown glimpses of production, particularly from 2020-21, when he slashed .270/.335/.488 with an .823 OPS; however, he only played in 75 games over that span due to injury.

Engel is the favorite to be the club's fourth outfielder, and as a right-handed hitter, he could potentially platoon with incumbent center fielder Trent Grisham, a left-handed hitter who himself has been strong defensively but inconsistent offensively. José Azocar could work his way into that mix as well.

In 119 games for the White Sox last season, Engel slashed .224/.269/.310, while splitting time between center and right field. If Fernando Tatis Jr. is indeed destined for a corner outfield spot, Engel could temporarily fill his lineup spot while the Padres await Tatis' return from suspension in late April.

Honeywell, meanwhile, was selected by Tampa Bay in the second round of the 2014 MLB Draft, then spent his first eight years as a pro in the Rays' organization before joining Oakland in 2022. He owns a career 3.21 ERA across parts of six seasons in the Minors and made three big league appearances with the Rays in ‘21.

Once ranked among the sport's top pitching prospects, Honeywell endured several years’ worth of injury setbacks in the Rays' organization. He underwent Tommy John surgery in 2017, then had three further surgeries on his throwing arm before he returned to the mound and ultimately made his big league debut in '21.

Honeywell was dealt to Oakland after the 2021 season but didn't pitch in the big leagues in '22. He slumped to a 7.08 ERA in 13 appearances in the A's system last year. Still, the Padres see upside in Honeywell and the mid-90s fastball that he pairs with a swing-and-miss changeup.

San Diego's rotation was already strong at the top entering the offseason, with Yu Darvish, Joe Musgrove and Blake Snell. Nick Martinez and Seth Lugo are expected to help fill out that group of starters. But the Padres’ depth beyond those five had been lacking. Add Honeywell to the group of arms looking to help fill that void.

Padres’ Fernando Tatis Jr. cleared to resume baseball activities: Source

Padres infielder-outfielder Fernando Tatis Jr. has been cleared to resume baseball activities this weekend, a team source told The Athletic on Friday. The development marks a notable step in Tatis’ rehabilitation from multiple surgeries. Here’s what you need to know:BackstoryAft...

Padres infielder-outfielder Fernando Tatis Jr. has been cleared to resume baseball activities this weekend, a team source told The Athletic on Friday. The development marks a notable step in Tatis’ rehabilitation from multiple surgeries. Here’s what you need to know:

Backstory

After Tatis’ recent surgeries, the hope all along had been that he would be able to resume baseball activity sometime in January. Friday’s news confirms Tatis is on schedule, if not slightly ahead of it.

Much about the path ahead remains uncertain. Tatis has not played major-league baseball since the end of the 2021 season. He is attempting to come back from multiple significant operations. He remains suspended after testing positive for Clostebol, an anabolic steroid, last year. And his defensive assignment in 2023 is still a bit unclear.

Getting back on the field represents a step toward answering those questions. Tatis can participate in spring training, including Cactus League games, while he is suspended, and the Padres hope he will be in good shape by the time players report to Arizona next month.

Where is Tatis physically?

We’ll know more by next month — the pace of his hitting progression is unclear — but the Padres feel he’s in a good spot. Tatis, who had his first wrist surgery in March, went for a second, smaller operation in October after there was some debate about the level of healing in his wrist. Now, doctors feel more confident the wrist is progressing as hoped.

Of course, there is a shoulder to worry about, too. Other players have had similar operations and struggled coming back, at least initially. Tatis’ health will be a major storyline in spring training. On Friday, he was en route to San Diego to begin his journey back to playing shape.

Where will he play?

After the signing of shortstop Xander Bogaerts, somewhere in the outfield. Right field might make the most sense for Tatis and his arm. (Juan Soto has indicated to the team he is open to playing either corner-outfield position.) But the Padres also believe Tatis will give them another option in center field alongside Gold Glove Award winner Trent Grisham. Tatis can play left field, too.

At this point, no final decisions have been made; the Padres expect to settle on a more concrete plan by next month. And Tatis could still return to the infield at some point, if not in the immediate future. Bogaerts is not a lock to stay at shortstop beyond 2023, and team officials continue to view Tatis as an option at short and second base. A lot will depend on his health and the state of the roster.

Are the Padres done adding pieces?

They could be done in terms of guaranteed contracts. People familiar with the team’s thinking say the Padres are up against a self-prescribed spending limit. Owner Peter Seidler, of course, has repeatedly shown a willingness to stretch his own budget, but another notable signing might come as a surprise. The Padres have shown interest in free-agent starter Johnny Cueto, but they may be reluctant to meet his asking price.

San Diego does need more starting pitching, so there could be more non-roster additions and, at some point, a trade. The Padres also could use another bat, especially since Tatis will miss at least the first 20 games of the 2023 season. For now, they appear to be banking on the idea that he will be at least semi-productive when he returns.

Required reading

(Photo: Darren Yamashita / USA Today)

Aztecs get defensive lineman from Oklahoma State

San Diego State picked up some help for its depleted defensive line when Oklahoma State senior transfer Samuela Tuihalamaka indicated late Friday night on social media he has signed with SDSU.Tuihalamaka needed only two days to find a landing spot after entering the NCAA transfer portal on Wednesday. He is among more than a dozen Cowboys players to enter the portal.Tuihalamaka did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The 6-foot-1, 304-pound Tuihalamaka is a “super senior,” afforded one more year t...

San Diego State picked up some help for its depleted defensive line when Oklahoma State senior transfer Samuela Tuihalamaka indicated late Friday night on social media he has signed with SDSU.

Tuihalamaka needed only two days to find a landing spot after entering the NCAA transfer portal on Wednesday. He is among more than a dozen Cowboys players to enter the portal.

Tuihalamaka did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The 6-foot-1, 304-pound Tuihalamaka is a “super senior,” afforded one more year to play by virtue of the “COVID year” granted to players in 2020 by the NCAA.

The Aztecs lost their three super senior starters — defensive ends Keshawn Banks and Jonah Tavai and defensive tackle Justus Tavai — following the 2022 season.

While there are several backups eager to step into starting roles, SDSU was expected to scour the portal for experienced assistance.

That’s where Tuihalamaka enters the picture.

He played all 13 games this season in a backup role at Oklahoma State, totaling 23 tackles, with one sack among four tackles for loss, on a Cowboys team that went 7-6. He had two tackles in Oklahoma State’s 24-17 loss to Wisconsin in the Guaranteed Rate Bowl.

Tuihalamaka made an early impact at Oklahoma State, playing in 12 of 13 games (four starts) as a redshirt freshman in 2019. Then he played in only nine games combined (no starts) during his sophomore and junior years. Tuihalamaka’s Oklahoma State bio does not indicate whether injuries limited his availability those two seasons.

This is the second straight year SDSU has received help from an Oklahoma State transfer.

Offensive lineman Cade Bennett came from the Cowboys last season, and Bennett started at left guard for the Aztecs.

Returning to Southern California — he’s from Riverside and was a three-star recruit coming out of Santa Ana Mater Dei — gives Tuihalamaka an opportunity to conclude his collegiate career closer to home.

As a transfer, Tuihalamaka signs a grant-in-aid as opposed to the letter of intent inked by high school seniors.

GIAs are binding to the school, but not the player. As such, Tuihalamaka’s commitment does not become official until he attends a class. SDSU’s spring semester begins Jan. 18.

Tuihalamaka will compete in spring practice with, among others, three backups — seniors Garret Fountain and Wyatt Draeger and super senior Daniel Okpoko — looking to move into starting roles.

Fountain is the top returner in the group after collecting 39 tackles with three sacks among 5½ tackles for loss.

Tuihalamaka is the second Division I transfer in 10 days to join the Aztecs. On Dec. 29, New Mexico linebacker Cody Moon committed to SDSU.

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