Franchise Opportunities in San Francisco, CA

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Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in San Francisco, CA will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

Assistance-with-state-licensing

Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News Near Me San Francisco, CA

REPORT: Carlos Correa Signs 12-Year Contract with New York Mets

It appears Carlos Correa may not be playing for the San Francisco Giants after all.The New York Post's Jon Heyman is reporting that Correa has agreed to a 12-year, $315 million contract with the New York Mets.This is a stunning revelation, as Correa was supposed to be introduced to the media as the newest member of the San Francisco Giants, but an alleged medical concern p...

It appears Carlos Correa may not be playing for the San Francisco Giants after all.

The New York Post's Jon Heyman is reporting that Correa has agreed to a 12-year, $315 million contract with the New York Mets.

This is a stunning revelation, as Correa was supposed to be introduced to the media as the newest member of the San Francisco Giants, but an alleged medical concern postponed Tuesday's introductory press conference. Earlier this winter, ESPN's Buster Olney reported that Major League executives were concerned about Correa's lower back.

Correa had reportedly agreed to a 13-year, $350 million contract with the Giants a little over a week ago.

Hours before the Giants agreed in principle to a deal with Correa, The Athletic's Ken Rosenthal, Dan Hayes and Andy McCullough reported that the Mets had emerged as a potential landing spot for the two-time All-Star.

At the time of the report, the club's payroll was projected to sit around $350 million, before hitting the luxury tax penalties. With penalties, the club's payroll would be approximately $421 million, the largest payroll in baseball history. That was before adding Correa and Adam Ottavino, who the club re-signed Tuesday afternoon.

If Correa does in fact play for the Mets, he would likely play third base, similar to when the New York Yankees acquired Alex Rodriguez and Rodriguez moved to third, with Derek Jeter already manning short. The Mets have Francisco Lindor under contract through 2031. Correa and Lindor are both from the same native country of Puerto Rico.

It remains unclear what exactly transpired between Correa and the Giants. It was odd that his introductory press conference was suddenly postponed. Did Correa fail his physical, terminating his deal with the Giants? Did the Giants see something that concerned them, causing them to withdraw their offer? Or was there ever really a medical concern in the first place? We should be finding out very soon.

According to Heyman, Correa's team and the Giants had difference of opinion on the physical, and Correa's agent Scott Boras worked out a deal with Mets owner Steve Cohen.

"We needed one more thing, and this was it," Cohen told Heyman.

Correa has played in 111 or more games just three times in his eight-year Major League career. He has landed on the Injured List seven times.

Correa joins a star-studded infield that includes Lindor, Pete Alonso and Jeff McNeil.

More MLB Offseason Coverage:

Timeline: Flood Watch until Tuesday as Bay Area faces several more storms

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The Bay Area will continue to see rain with more incoming storms, as recovery continues from several powerful atmospheric rivers and a bomb cyclone that devastated the region.A Flood Watch has been posted until Tuesday afternoon for the entire Bay Area. Excessive runoff from creeks, streams & rivers in low-lying & flood-prone areas. There will also be mud/landslides and potentially impassable roads. Please stay alert to the forecasts!A level 2 system arrives today with a Wind Advisory for the nort...

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The Bay Area will continue to see rain with more incoming storms, as recovery continues from several powerful atmospheric rivers and a bomb cyclone that devastated the region.

A Flood Watch has been posted until Tuesday afternoon for the entire Bay Area. Excessive runoff from creeks, streams & rivers in low-lying & flood-prone areas. There will also be mud/landslides and potentially impassable roads. Please stay alert to the forecasts!

A level 2 system arrives today with a Wind Advisory for the north bay starting at 4 a.m. and lasting through 1 p.m. Sunday. Wind gusts could range from 25 to 45 mph with higher gusts over ridgetops until about 1 p.m. on Sunday. The front will continue pushing southward throughout the day reaching the rest of the bay with the wind advisory starting at 10 a.m. far south in Monterey & Santa Cruz.

The heaviest rain will fall Saturday afternoon and evening, into early Sunday.

Rain Totals:

North Bay: 1.5"- 3" with higher elevations getting 2.5"-5".

SF & Peninsula: 1"-2" at lower elevations at 2"-3" at higher elevations.

East Bay: lower elevation .50 far East Bay to 2" near the bay.

South Bay: lower elevations .75"-1.5", higher elevations 1"-3".

Santa Cruz: 1"-2" lower elevations, 2"-3.5" higher elevations.

Sunday night into Tuesday will feature a wetter and stronger system, with a level 3 on the ABC7 Storm Impact Scale.

The heaviest rain will be 4 a.m. Monday to 4 p.m. Monday. Flooding is possible Sunday night with wind gusts Monday approaching 40-60 mph again.

An additional 2-6 inches of rain is expected with this level 3 system.

Rain will taper off late Monday into Tuesday. More wet weather follows the rest of the weak although amounts will be less than the weekend & Monday storms.

In the Greater Lake Tahoe Area, A Winter Storm Warning has been posted from 4 a.m. Saturday until 4 a.m. Monday. A Winter Storm Watch above 6000 feet has been posted from late Sunday until late Tuesday above 6000 feet. Snow will begin to impact lower elevations tonight in the Tahoe area.

For the Winter Storm Warning; heavy wet snow up to 12", except 1-2 feet above 7000 feet. Winds will gust as high as 90 mph.

For the Winter Storm Watch above 6000 feet, another 12" except 2-5 feet above 7000 feet.

Cars Half Submerged as San Francisco Hit With Flooding Amid 'Extreme' Storm

Photos of cars submerged in San Francisco circulated online Saturday afternoon after the city was hit with flooding caused by "extreme" weather conditions.The "extreme" weather included heavy rain, snow, and wind hitting different parts of California on Saturday and causing flooding and landslides after another "atmospheric river" struck the West coast, The New York Times reported.The storm in San Francisco broke a 173-year old precipitation record, according to the National Weather Servic...

Photos of cars submerged in San Francisco circulated online Saturday afternoon after the city was hit with flooding caused by "extreme" weather conditions.

The "extreme" weather included heavy rain, snow, and wind hitting different parts of California on Saturday and causing flooding and landslides after another "atmospheric river" struck the West coast, The New York Times reported.

The storm in San Francisco broke a 173-year old precipitation record, according to the National Weather Service, KRON4 reported. The highest precipitation record was 2.12 inches of rain that happened in 1849. San Francisco saw 2.96 inches of rain, as of late Saturday morning, with more to come.

Twitter user Doug Lawrence posted an 8-second video of multiple cars parked under the rainfall with some submerged due to flooding.

"From drought to mini flood in San Francisco. We had 3.3"+ of rain in the last 24 hours," Lawrence wrote.

Meanwhile, the San Francisco Fire Department announced on Twitter that all lanes of Highway 101 at Oyster Point in the south part of the city were shut down because of "extreme roadway flooding."

The San Francisco Fire Department told Newsweek that there were no injuries or fatalities so far, and that "dozens" of areas were affected and "dozens" of cars were stuck because of the flooding.

Some videos showed drivers struggling to drive their cars as the highway was flooded with rain. Bloomberg News reporter Mark Chediak said the 101 had "serious flooding."

Mark Andrews, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) spokesperson said that high tides might have been a contributor to the flooding, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

Flooding also happened in the city of Palo Alto near Pardee Park, according to Raj Mathai, a news anchor at NBC-owned KNTV.

The powerful "atmospheric river" causing San Francisco's weather conditions is often called "pineapple express" because it quickly transfers water vapor from Hawaii to the West coast, according to The Chronicle.

Flood watches and wind advisories are still in place amid heavy rainfall along the coast and as snow covers the Sierra Nevada Mountains, according to the National Weather Service.

Weather forecasters expected heavy snow to fall this weekend in areas around Lake Tahoe, in eastern California and western Nevada. The National Weather Service recently warned that California's Eastern Sierra region, which makes up the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada Mountain range, would see "showers, heavy snow, and slight chance of thunderstorms" Saturday morning and then rain and heavy snow in the afternoon.

8 Places in California Where Home Prices Have Plummeted

California is one of the states in the U.S. where dreams really do come true. From the majestic sceneries up and down the coastline to the variety of fresh foods and the industries of Silicon Valley and Hollywood, California truly has it all. And it's going to cost you to live there.In case you haven't been to the Golden State in a while or checked ...

California is one of the states in the U.S. where dreams really do come true. From the majestic sceneries up and down the coastline to the variety of fresh foods and the industries of Silicon Valley and Hollywood, California truly has it all. And it's going to cost you to live there.

In case you haven't been to the Golden State in a while or checked home prices, one thing to know before you decide to move there is that it's expensive. Not only are essentials like gas and food more pricey, but real estate is at the top of the market.

Has your California dream turned into a nightmare? Fear not, because GoBankingRates is breaking down the eight cities in California where home prices have gone down drastically and where you could perhaps purchase your home on the West Coast state that has it all.

San Francisco Sept. Median Sale Price: $1,196,667 3-month change in price: minus-$188,333 3-month change in price: minus-15.74% The City by the Bay has something to offer everyone, especially if you are in the tech or entrepreneurial sector for work. But the cost of rent is out of this world.Despite the rate of rent going up 101% in 2021, more young professionals are moving to San Francisco, making it the perfect place to start your career and become a homebuyer all in one place. Take Our Poll: Do You Think Student Loan Debt Should Be Forgiven?

San Jose Sept. Median Sale Price: $1,480,000 3-month change in price: minus-$173,833 3-month change in price: minus-11.75% Just down the peninsula from San Francisco is San Jose, the epic center of Silicon Valley with access to mountains, beaches and lots of nature surrounding the city limits. Plus, it's the new place to strike it rich. San Jose has the highest number of wealthy individuals in the world: One in every 727 citizens is worth $30 million, according to the 2021 Wealth-X World Ultra Wealth Report. Find your way here while the housing market is as fair as the city's idyllic weather.

RiversideSept. Median Sale Price: $545,0003-month change in price: minus-$25,3333-month change in price: minus-4.65%Situated just in between its sister cities of Los Angeles and San Diego is Riverside, a great place to buy a home, as well as be entertained. While LA might have movies and television locked down, there's a thriving art and performance scene in Riverside. Make sure to check out the Fox Performing Arts Center, the Riverside Municipal Auditorium and Events Center and the Riverside Art Museum. If you're interested in history, Riverside has institutions such as the Mission Inn Museum and Riverside Metropolitan Museum to quench the thirst for knowledge from scholars of all fields.

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S.F.’s famous Bay Bridge lights will come down soon — unless $11 million is donated for an even better version

The view from the Embarcadero at dusk Thursday felt like a metaphor for San Francisco itself.To the north, ominous storm clouds loomed as huge puddles left from the torrential rains dotted the road. But to the south, one of the largest light sculptures in the world shimmered and illuminated the silhouette of the Bay Bridge as a nearly full moon rose behind it, pelicans swooped past and revelers...

The view from the Embarcadero at dusk Thursday felt like a metaphor for San Francisco itself.

To the north, ominous storm clouds loomed as huge puddles left from the torrential rains dotted the road. But to the south, one of the largest light sculptures in the world shimmered and illuminated the silhouette of the Bay Bridge as a nearly full moon rose behind it, pelicans swooped past and revelers sipped martinis inside a luminous Waterbar.

At this precarious time for San Francisco, which has faced a cascade of crises over the past few years, the city could veer one of two ways: toward gloom and darkness or toward beauty, creativity and light. Ben Davis is betting on the latter — and he has an inspiring plan to help make it happen.

The founder of Illuminate, a nonprofit that creates light-filled public art, had the initial idea for “Bay Lights,” the 25,000 LED lights that sparkle in an ever-changing, abstract display stretching 1.8 miles across 300 cables on the western span of the Bay Bridge.

But after 10 years, the installation is a bit like San Francisco itself: a great idea with a glowing past that’s worn out, broken in parts and increasingly expensive to fix. Once you notice the display’s bald patches where long stretches of lights have failed, you realize that the installation needs a refresh.

So on March 5, sadly, “Bay Lights” will go dark. But there’s a glimmer of hope: Davis has a plan to bring them back, better than ever. He just needs the money to do it.

If he can raise $1 million apiece from 10 wealthy people — one has committed so far — plus another $1 million in small donations, he intends to spearhead a new installation. It would illuminate the bridge again by Labor Day weekend with twice as many lights, and they’d be far sturdier. He explained he has just one co-worker and it’s actually easier to raise larger amounts from fewer people than to hit up large crowds for the same amount.

Instead of just twinkling on the bridge’s north side, visible only to those living in the northern part of San Francisco and Marin, the lights will adorn the south sides of the same cables too. That means the display would be visible to those in the southern part of the city, as well as Oakland, Alameda and beyond.

And they’d even be visible to drivers heading into the city past a shimmering, Welcome to San Francisco-style wall of light. Ten years ago, Davis thought including lights on the south side of the cables visible to drivers would be too distracting, but now that drivers cope with cell phones, large display screens in their cars and a light show atop Salesforce Tower, he’s no longer worried about it.

“We’re working closely and safely with bridge officials to reimagine “Bay Lights” on both sides of the cables,” Davis told me, describing his vision as “a magical portal through which you can enter the city.”

We chatted at Waterbar, which has the best indoor view of the light show, and where renowned light artist Leo Villareal designed “Bay Lights,” next to a picture window overlooking the bridge. He’s signed on to create the new version too.

“It’s a crazy idea, and the Bay Area feels like the perfect place for crazy ideas that become real,” Villareal told me. “It’s very moving the effect artwork can have on people, and I really, truly hope it can help the city get through this period.”

The new version, dubbed “Bay Lights 360” for its much broader reach, will look similar to the current version: constantly changing, abstract patterns with no beginning, middle or end. Villareal said “Bay Lights” inspired other cities to create similar light shows, too. He worked on London’s Illuminated River on bridges over the Thames in 2021, for example.

The original “Bay Lights” consisted of off-the-shelf products from an international conglomerate, but Davis has secured Musco Lighting, a family-owned firm out of Iowa, to specially craft the new lights, which should stand up to wind, rain, fog, car exhaust and other elements much better, he said.

Anybody who donates a $1 million tax-deductible gift will receive a special edition Villareal artwork, recognition on a waterfront plaque and invitations to exclusive celebrations. Matt Mullenweg, a web developer who created WordPress, has pledged $1 million.

Before taking over Illuminate, Davis ran his own public relations firm called Words Pictures Ideas and specialized in branding and communications related to infrastructure projects — including one improving seismic safety on the Bay Bridge.

His idea for “Bay Lights” came over an early-morning coffee at the Ferry Building in September 2010. He vividly remembers watching the sun rise between the cables of the bridge, a span he knew would mark its 75th birthday the following year — and which never got the the same love and adoration as its big red neighbor to the north.

“How do you let this bridge shine again in the region’s consciousness?” he remembers thinking. “I thought, what if this was a canvas of light?”

The bridge opened in November 1936 after just three years of construction. (Imagine that! It takes twice that long — or longer — to build affordable apartments in the city these days.)

“It was a moment of pride coming out of the Great Depression,” Davis said. “It was a symbol of American ingenuity.”

But just six months later, the Golden Gate Bridge opened and consumed the attention of city residents, photographers and postcard makers.

“The Bay Bridge became the Cinderella bridge, this hardworking, mostly overlooked bridge,” Davis said. “If people thought about it at all, it was mostly from a sense of annoyance that they had to get across it.”

He realized glamorizing the bridge with a light show would take a lot of time and money so he disbanded his firm and founded Illuminate to both fundraise and helm the creation of the giant art piece. “Bay Lights” opened in March 2013 as a temporary sculpture, but was made permanent in 2015 — or as permanent as equipment on a busy bridge can be. Davis acknowledged he expected the lights to last longer than they did.

“Bay Lights” was just the first step in what Davis called his own “magical journey” — which became a magical journey for San Francisco too. Illuminate has brightened the city during the past several depressing years, including spearheading the Golden Mile project on JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park to convert the thoroughfare into an ebullient car-free space with murals, pianos, seating and Doggie Diner heads.

It’s also lit up the Conservatory of Flowers, Grace Cathedral and the Music Concourse bandshell and installed Harvey Milk’s quote “Hope Will Never Be Silent” in neon at Castro and Market streets. Even the Pink Triangle atop Twin Peaks during Pride Month got the Illuminate treatment, the pink canvas giving way to 3,000 LED pink nodes on the hill.

Davis said he loves creating artwork that everybody can see and enjoy — for free. But it takes a lot of fundraising to get there. And he refuses to go the corporate branding route, rejecting a multimillion-dollar offer from Audi years ago, he said, to shine its four-circle logo on the bridge in lights.

Asked why our richest citizens should give money to a light show when there are more pressing needs in San Francisco, Davis said he wants philanthropists to dig deeper, not to withhold money from any other cause.

And that art is crucial too, especially in these bleak times, as it not only lifts people’s spirits but draws tourists to the city to support restaurants, hotels and other institutions. A group led by McKinsey estimated “Bay Lights” had boosted the regional economy by $100 million annually.

Pete Sittnick, managing partner at Waterbar, confirmed “Bay Lights” has been a boon financially and spiritually. Tourists and locals alike constantly ask for the tables with the best views of the lights.

“It makes people happy, which is ultimately the goal of a restaurant,” Sittnick said.

And if Davis can’t raise the $11 million? Simple. No more “Bay Lights”.

“We’re just going to do our best,” he said with a shrug. “If we fail, one of the most beautiful aspects of San Francisco will go dark. This is a challenging time, and San Francisco needs to reinvent itself one more time.”

I believe San Francisco can do it — that “Bay Lights” and the city itself will regain their lost luster. And that we’ll appreciate both of them even more once they do.

“Light,” Davis said as we parted, “finds its highest purpose in darkness.”

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