Franchise Opportunities in San Francisco, CA

Service-Logo Service-logo

Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in San Francisco, CA will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

Assistance-with-state-licensing

Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News in San Francisco, CA

Homelessness up in Bay Area, Down Slightly in San Francisco

FILE - A man stands near tents on a sidewalk in San Francisco, Nov. 21, 2020. A one-night count found San Francisco's homeless population dipped slightly to roughly 7,800 people in 2022. The last point-in-time count found more than 8,000 residents in 2019 in a city where unhoused people are highly visible. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File) The Associated PressSAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Homelessness increased nearly 9% in the San Francisco Bay Area over the last three years, despite hundreds of millions of dollars spent to keep people off the...

FILE - A man stands near tents on a sidewalk in San Francisco, Nov. 21, 2020. A one-night count found San Francisco's homeless population dipped slightly to roughly 7,800 people in 2022. The last point-in-time count found more than 8,000 residents in 2019 in a city where unhoused people are highly visible. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File) The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Homelessness increased nearly 9% in the San Francisco Bay Area over the last three years, despite hundreds of millions of dollars spent to keep people off the streets during the coronavirus pandemic, preliminary numbers released Monday show. San Francisco appeared to be the one bright spot, seeing homelessness decline slightly.

Alameda County, which includes the city of Oakland, reported a 22% increase in this year's point-in-time survey, while neighboring Contra Costa County saw a 35% jump in people spotted living in shelters, vehicles or outdoors. The largest county in the region, Santa Clara, reported a 3% increase from 2019, including an 11% increase in the city of San Jose.

San Francisco reported a 3.5% decline to nearly 7,800 homeless residents, which housing advocates chalked up in part to a wealth tax approved by voters in 2018.

In total, seven of the Bay Area's nine counties reported counting more than 35,000 people experiencing homelessness in late February. The count is required every other year by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and helps determine funding. San Mateo and Solano counties did not report preliminary numbers Monday.

Housing advocates said increases across the region would have been worse without strong and speedy intervention from the state and local government. California Gov. Gavin Newsom made money available at the start of the pandemic to house homeless residents in hotels and eviction moratoriums helped keep people in their homes.

The San Francisco Bay Area “staved off a catastrophic increase in homelessness” over the last three years, said regional housing advocacy group group All Home in a statement released Monday. The 2021 count was canceled due to the pandemic and this year’s count was conducted in late February.

“Bay Area governments and nonprofits played deep defense on homelessness during the pandemic and we have more or less held the line — but now we need to go on offense and end the suffering on our streets” said Tomiquia Moss, the nonprofit group’s founder and CEO.

San Francisco has often served as the poster city for homelessness given the high visibility of tent encampments. But preliminary figures show a 15% decrease in people who are living unsheltered outdoors and an 11% decline in its chronically homeless single adult population.

The Feb. 23 count in San Francisco found 7,754 people living in shelters, vehicles or outdoors, down from 8,035 in 2019 but still more than the nearly 6,900 reported in 2017. Mayor London Breed credited the numbers to an increase in shelter beds and transitional housing by her administration.

Jennifer Friedenbach, executive director of the city's Coalition on Homelessness, called the news welcome and exciting, and credited money provided by Prop. C, a tax on San Francisco’s wealthiest companies approved by voters in 2018 for the benefit of homeless residents. The measure, opposed by Breed, divided the city's tech elite.

“Once we start making a real dent in chronic homelessness, we’ll start going into the extremely low-income population and people without behavioral health issues,” said Friedenbach. “I think we’ve got a lot more great things to come.”

Officials involved with the count in Alameda County said at a news conference Monday that much of the overall increase was driven by a nearly 40% rise in people living in vehicles, including cars and RVs, and a 53% increase in people enrolled in shelter programs.

They also said that its 22% increase over three years was a slower rate than the 20% annual increases it had been seeing.

“We consider this to be a huge success and a direct reflection of the additional resources that were infused into our system,” said Chelsea Andrews, executive director of EveryOne Home, which helped conducted the count.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

San Francisco CA Luxury Residential Real Estate – Bay Area Market Report Release

San Francisco,United States – May 16, 2022 —The new report, entitled “Bay Area Real Estate Market Analysis as Employees Return to Offices”, addresses the pressing and recurring question of the state of the Bay Area real estate market in the wake of widespread employment changes.More details can be found at: https://blacklabel-realestate.com/blog/bay-area-rea...

San Francisco,United States – May 16, 2022 —

The new report, entitled “Bay Area Real Estate Market Analysis as Employees Return to Offices”, addresses the pressing and recurring question of the state of the Bay Area real estate market in the wake of widespread employment changes.

More details can be found at: https://blacklabel-realestate.com/blog/bay-area-real-estate-market-analysis-as-employees-return-to-offices

The new report discusses the question of fewer taxes and restrictions in places like Texas leading to an exodus from the Bay Area. Farnham notes that leading companies are unwilling to waste the billions of dollars invested in their infrastructure, and have veered away from their initial encouragement of remote work. A hybrid model has been widely adopted, and recalling to the workplace is expected to continue.

The Bay Area has a rich and colorful cultural history, the latest chapter of which has seen it become the home of technological titans like Apple, Facebook, and Salesforce. Demand for real estate has been consistently high. However, the pandemic led many to question the durability of the Bay Area real estate market, given the widespread adoption of remote work.

The report lists several recent Bay Area company policies relating to remote work, reflecting a shift towards a return to offices or a part-time hybrid model. Companies cited include Google, Uber, Twitter, Facebook, and Apple.

Despite many people indeed leaving the Bay Area because of the pandemic, the real estate market has increased. With the return to offices, Farnham predicts that demand will grow even more.

Black Label Real Estate is a San Francisco-based luxury realtor serving San Francisco, Sonoma County, Napa County, and East Bay. Its mission is to provide top-quality residential real estate services, with a particular emphasis on clients’ needs and concerns.

A satisfied client said: “I can’t say enough good things about Tim. He is a real estate expert. He represented me when I sold my home in San Francisco last year and really nailed it. It was in the middle of the pandemic and I was expecting the process to be a nightmare. I’m happy to say my realtor prevented that from being a reality.”

All interested parties can find further information at https://blacklabel-realestate.com

Contact Info: Name: Black Label Real Estate Email: Send Email Organization: Black Label Real Estate Address: 1160 Battery St. East Suite 100, San Francisco, CA 94111, United States Phone: +1-415-347-0984 Website: http://BlackLabel-RealEstate.com

Release ID: 89074829

If you detect any issues, problems, or errors in this press release content, kindly contact [email protected] to notify us. We will respond and rectify the situation in the next 8 hours.

COMTEX_407251922/2773/2022-05-16T04:18:54

New major music festival from Coachella promoters coming to San Francisco's Pier 80

Move over Outside Lands, there's a new music festival in town.Goldenvoice, best known as the promoter behind Coachella, just announced the inaugural lineup for the ...

Move over Outside Lands, there's a new music festival in town.

Goldenvoice, best known as the promoter behind Coachella, just announced the inaugural lineup for the Portola Music Festival, which is slated to take place at San Francisco's Pier 80 on Sept. 24 and 25. The event's name is a reference to the Portola Festival of 1909, which signaled a reopening of the city after the 1906 earthquake and drew an estimated 1 million people to its opening parade.

The event is scheduled only a month and a half after Outside Lands 2022 and a week before Hardly Strictly, which might beg the question as to whether the city really needs another massive festival. However for fans of electronic music, the answer is a big yes.

Outside Lands threw a couple bones to dance music fans (Disclosure, Polo & Pan, Claude VonStroke, Dixon), but the offerings get much slimmer in the small font of the poster (no disrespect to Avalon Emerson and DJ Seinfeld). Portola aims to fill that void with a deep lineup that's a top-to-bottom treat for electronic music fans, sprinkled with a few crossover headliners.

Flume and Chemical Brothers get top billing, and a strong second tier of artists includes the likes of Kaytranada, Jamie xx, Jungle, Charlie XCX, M.I.A. and James Blake.

Local favorite Toro y Moi, fresh off the release of "Mahal," will also appear. The triumvirate of Caribou, Floating Points and Four Tet are on the bill, plus sample savants The Avalanches and a live set from British deep house dons Bicep. Tastemaking DJs like Black Madonna and Danilo Plessow (MCDE) return to SF after recent appearances. More local support comes from Public Release label owner Eug and DJ Dials, booker for 1015 Folsom, among other popular venues. Kelly Lee Owens, Ross From Friends and Yaeji represent the next generation of marquee electronic music producers and DJ Shadow and Fatboy Slim add some throwback appeal.

See the full lineup at the Portola Music Festival website; tickets go on sale on Friday.

Study of Pregnant Women Finds Increasing Chemical Exposure

Latinas Had Higher Levels of Many Potentially Dangerous ChemicalsA national study that enrolled a highly diverse group of pregnant women over 12 years found rising exposure to chemicals from plastics and pesticides that may be harmful to development.Many of the chemicals that the women had been exposed to were replacement chemicals: new forms of chemicals that have been banned or phased out that may be just as harmful as the ones they replaced. The study also found many women had been exposed to neonicotinoids, a kind of pestic...

Latinas Had Higher Levels of Many Potentially Dangerous Chemicals

A national study that enrolled a highly diverse group of pregnant women over 12 years found rising exposure to chemicals from plastics and pesticides that may be harmful to development.

Many of the chemicals that the women had been exposed to were replacement chemicals: new forms of chemicals that have been banned or phased out that may be just as harmful as the ones they replaced. The study also found many women had been exposed to neonicotinoids, a kind of pesticide that is toxic to bees.

Researchers measured 103 chemicals, mostly from pesticides, plastics, and replacement chemicals for BPA and phthalates, using a new method that captured dozens of chemicals or chemical traces from a single urine sample.

More than 80 percent of the chemicals were found in at least one of the women in the study, and more than a third of the chemicals were found in a majority of the participants. The study also found that some of these chemicals were present in higher amounts than seen in earlier studies.

Our findings make clear that the number and scope of chemicals in pregnant women are increasing during a very vulnerable time of development for both the pregnant person and the fetus.

Tracey J. Woodruff, PhD

“This is the first time we’ve been able to measure the amounts of chemicals in such a large and diverse group of pregnant women – not just identify chemicals,” said Tracey J. Woodruff, PhD, professor and director of the UC San Francisco Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment and co-director of the UCSF EaRTH Center, and the senior author of the study, appearing online May 10, 2022, in Environmental Science & Technology. “Our findings make clear that the number and scope of chemicals in pregnant women are increasing during a very vulnerable time of development for both the pregnant person and the fetus.”

Prenatal exposure to industrial chemicals can come from air, food, water, plastics, and other industrial and consumer products. Although these chemicals could be harmful to pregnancy and child development, few of these chemicals are routinely monitored in people.

The study included 171 women from California, Georgia, Illinois, New Hampshire, New York, and Puerto Rico who are part of the National Institutes of Health Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes program. About one-third (34%) were white, 40% were Latina, 20% were Black, and the remaining 6% were from other or multiple groups.

The study found higher exposures for non-white women, those with lower educational attainment, or who were single or had been exposed to tobacco. But Latinas had especially high levels of parabens, which are used as preservatives, as well as phthalates and bisphenols, which are used in plastics.

“While pesticides and replacement chemicals were prevalent in all women, we were surprised to find that Latinas had substantially higher levels of parabens, phthalates and bisphenols,” said Jessie Buckley, PhD, associate professor of environmental health and engineering, as well as of epidemiology, at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and first author of the study. “This could be the result of higher exposures to products with chemicals, such as processed foods or personal care products,” Buckley said.

Authors: The full list of authors is available in the paper.

Funding: Research reported in this publication was supported by the Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) program, Office of The Director, National Institutes of Health, under Award Numbers U2COD023375 (Coordinating Center), U24OD023382 (Data Analysis Center), U24OD023319 (PRO Core), U2CES026542 (HHEAR), and UH3OD023251, UH3OD023272, UH3OD023275, UH3OD023287, UH3OD023290, UH3OD023318, UH3OD023342, UH3OD023349, UH3OD023347, UH3OD023365 (cohort grantees).

Black Restaurant Week 2022 Kicks Off In SF Bay Area

The "week" actually runs May 13-22 highlighting Black-owned eateries. Participants primarily from Alameda, Albany, Berkeley, Oakland & SF. SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, CA — Black restaurant owners in the Bay Area and nationwide are prepping for Black Restaurant Week, which starts Friday and lasts through May 22.The celebration is designed to help Black restaurateurs earn a living by promoting their craft.In...

The "week" actually runs May 13-22 highlighting Black-owned eateries. Participants primarily from Alameda, Albany, Berkeley, Oakland & SF.

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, CA — Black restaurant owners in the Bay Area and nationwide are prepping for Black Restaurant Week, which starts Friday and lasts through May 22.

The celebration is designed to help Black restaurateurs earn a living by promoting their craft.

In Alameda County, Kingston 11 Cuisine in Oakland, Karibu Wine Lounge by Wachira in Alameda, Cali Alley in Berkeley, Home of Chicken and Waffles in Oakland, Kimmie's Kitchen in Oakland and Nell's House in Oakland, KC's BBQ in Albany, among others, are participating. (SEE LIST & MAP HERE)

Participating San Francisco restaurants include Boug Cali, a West Coast Creole shack, El Nuevo Fruitlandia, serving Puerto Rican and Cuban food, and among others, Teranga, an African kitchen.

"We're super excited," said Black Restaurant Week co-founder Derek Robinson, who along with Warren Luckett and Falayn Ferrell started Black Restaurant Week in 2015 in Houston.

Following their success there, they expanded to two weeks and started serving restaurants in Atlanta and the Bay Area. This year they are helping Black businesses in 15 localities.

Black Restaurant Week includes support for other food enterprises, too, such as food trucks and caterers. It also supports bartenders.

Last year, 1,200 Black-owned businesses received support during the celebration, which bumped up sales by 15 percent on average.

"We do see an uptick in business," said Kingston 11 chef and owner Nigel Jones, who is participating for the third year.

Jones said traffic increases and people from all races and ethnicities visit his Jamaican-focused restaurant that is influenced by cultures around the world including France and Latin America.

"We have everybody in there," he said, including Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and Gov. Gavin Newsom. Kingston 11 has been in business since 2013.

Jones said it's important for him to support Black Restaurant Week and get support, too. During segregation in the U.S., Black business owners did business only with Black people.

Some extra level of attention is needed in some areas, and this is one of them, Jones said.

November to February is typically the slowest time for restaurants, he said. That is why cities typically host restaurant weeks during that period, he said.

"A little extra support, it helps," Jones said.

Manna Tekie, co-owner of Southern Italian restaurant Marzano in Oakland, said Black Restaurant Week has been great for her business.

Marzano is a neighborhood business, and that unfortunately means few people outside of the neighborhood knew about us. That changed when they participated in Black Restaurant Week.

"It really put us on the map," Tekie said.

Now people come from places as far away as Sacramento and Fresno to eat at Marzano.

"We couldn't have done it without that exposure," Tekie said.

She and co-owner Robert Holt are participating for the third year. The first year they participated was in 2020, at the beginning of the pandemic.

Tekie said sales have gone up 20 to 25 percent because of Black Restaurant Week.

Businesses can still sign up to participate. Visit link here for more information.

Copyright © 2022 Bay City News, Inc.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.