Franchise Opportunities in Seattle, WA

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Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in Seattle, WA will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

Assistance-with-state-licensing

Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News in Seattle, WA

WA students can get excused absences for mental health under new law

The Mental Health Project is a Seattle Times initiative focused on covering mental and behavioral health issues. It is funded by Ballmer Group, a national organization focused on economic mobility for children and families. The Seattle Times maintains editorial control over work produced by this team.Students in Washington will be able to take time off from school for mental health reasons beginning next school year, under a new state law and rules approved by the state superintendent’s office.Absences will be excused for...

The Mental Health Project is a Seattle Times initiative focused on covering mental and behavioral health issues. It is funded by Ballmer Group, a national organization focused on economic mobility for children and families. The Seattle Times maintains editorial control over work produced by this team.

Students in Washington will be able to take time off from school for mental health reasons beginning next school year, under a new state law and rules approved by the state superintendent’s office.

Absences will be excused for students experiencing symptoms related to mental illness or challenges with their mental health condition, and for medical appointments related to mental health. Those can include counseling, mental health wellness and behavioral health treatment — including inpatient or outpatient treatment, according to rules approved by the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, or OSPI.

Absences due to physical health needs will continue to be excused.

In all, students will have an unlimited number of excused absences to use for mental health needs. (Some schools have procedures to contact students with excessive absences to get them back into the classroom.) A doctor’s note or medical diagnosis is not a requirement for a mental health excused absence, said Bridget Underdahl, the supervisor of Project AWARE, a program within OSPI that promotes mental and behavioral health education.

“Mental has as much significance as physical health and is similarly important to one’s overall well-being,” she said, reading a clarification made in House Bill 1834, which ignited the change.

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The policy change comes about one year after Gov. Jay Inslee declared a youth mental health crisis. In doing so, he focused on the critical role schools play in supporting children’s mental health and mandated that school buildings reopen to all grades.

However, for some students, acclimating back into classrooms has been stressful and overwhelming after a year of online school. The pandemic has worsened children’s trauma and coping skills, and a lack of available services and staffing at mental health facilities has increased the waiting time to get treatment.

We’d like to hear from you.

The Mental Health Project team is listening. We’d like to know what questions you have about mental health and which stories you’d suggest we cover.

Get in touch with us at [email protected].

HB 1834, sponsored by a bipartisan group of lawmakers, was intended to alleviate some of the difficulty of going to school while dealing with a mental health condition.

After Inslee signed the bill into law, OSPI worked with a student advisory group to develop the specific policies that would be implemented at schools. The public had about six weeks to comment on drafted language, and the office held a public hearing on May 24 via Zoom. Rules were adopted soon after.

Jerri Clark, who founded Mothers of the Mentally Ill and works as a parent resource coordinator for Partnerships for Action, Voices for Empowerment, testified at the meeting.

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“A lot of the families I serve feel shamed and blamed by the truancy system when their children are struggling to maintain well-being, and they’re not able to show up for school because of that,” she said. “There is so much stigma in missing school because of a problem with mental well-being.”

Families also often face inconsistencies in how schools handle children’s absences for mental health needs, she said.

Other states, including Utah, Maine and Illinois, have included mental health among reasons for excusing absences. Colorado, Virginia and Arizona direct local school districts or state education agencies to allow students to take a certain number of mental health days. Nevada allows mental or behavioral health professionals to excuse students from school.

OSPI will communicate with the districts this month and in August about implementing the new rules.

Michelle Baruchman: [email protected]; on Twitter: @mlbaruchman.

Amid a COVID surge, WA hospital leaders wonder why fewer people seem to care

A wave of infections since mid-March has meant a steady increase in COVID-19 hospitalizations. But during this surge, fewer people seem to be talking about it.And that has hospital officials showing some frustration as they fear Washingtonians might not fully understand the burden on public health.Yes, most people are not getting as sick as they were during past peaks, Cassie Sauer, pres...

A wave of infections since mid-March has meant a steady increase in COVID-19 hospitalizations. But during this surge, fewer people seem to be talking about it.

And that has hospital officials showing some frustration as they fear Washingtonians might not fully understand the burden on public health.

Yes, most people are not getting as sick as they were during past peaks, Cassie Sauer, president of the Washington State Hospital Association, said in a Monday news briefing. And doctors and scientists have a better understanding of the disease now, as well as better access to antiviral drugs. Vaccination rates are also higher and new variants have, so far, been less severe.

That doesn’t mean people aren’t dying from COVID or suffering from long-term symptoms, hospital leaders said.

“It’s all the same stuff we’ve been doing all along. … And yet the community’s not feeling that at this point,” said Dr. David Carlson, chief physician officer at Tacoma-based MultiCare. “I don’t have a magic understanding of why that is other than there is just this enormous amount of fatigue, and COVID is not continually the story on the news today.”

Dr. Chris Baliga, infectious disease specialist at Virginia Mason Franciscan Health, added that people should not be surprised when they test positive for the virus now.

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“[Washingtonians] are just not as aware of it as perhaps they could be,” he said.

Fortunately, Sauer said, current infection and hospitalization levels are still lower than they were during the state’s last omicron surge. At the end of last week, health care systems counted about 600 COVID patients in hospitals across the state — an increase of about 10% from the previous week, though nowhere near the peak of 1,700 COVID hospitalizations in a given week in early February, she said.

The state is seeing about six to seven COVID deaths per day. About 20 to 25 COVID patients are on ventilators per day, compared to 100-plus in January.

At the end of last month, however, the state Department of Health recorded about 265 infections per 100,000 people, up from about 40 per 100,000 in mid-March and likely an undercount.

Last week, King County public health officer Dr. Jeff Duchin said on Twitter, “It’s likely we’ll continue to experience intermittent surges (with) increases in cases & lesser increases in hospitalizations & deaths for many months.”

Hospitalizations could be slowing in some parts of the state, including in Clark, King and Snohomish counties, said Dr. Steve Mitchell, medical director of Harborview Medical Center’s emergency department. He added, though, that those rates are still rising in Pierce, Skagit, Spokane and Benton counties.

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Mitchell also leads the Washington Medical Coordination Center, a system established when the pandemic began that serves as a clearinghouse for placing patients around the state when their nearest hospital can’t take them. In recent months, requests to the WMCC had been going down, but have doubled in the past few weeks, Mitchell said.

“This doubling of requests to our team represents that stress, which is rising in our health care system,” he said.

Although DOH reports average hospital capacity is about 91% full, several individual health care systems are overfilled — including MultiCare, which is operating at 120% capacity at all its Puget Sound area locations, according to Carlson.

While only a fraction of patients are admitted for COVID — most are in for delayed care and might test positive at the hospital — high community infection levels mean hospital staffers are regularly calling out sick, exacerbating worker shortages, he said.

Rising infection and hospitalization rates prompted Washington’s public health officials, including state Secretary of Health Dr. Umair Shah, to renew a push for indoor masking two weeks ago, but they stopped short of announcing new statewide mandates. On Monday, hospital leaders urged people to continue masking inside, staying socially distant and getting vaccinated.

Masks have become a “political problem as opposed to a public health problem,” Carlson said. “I think our public health officials need to think through what the most appropriate behaviors are, the things to do, as a mandate as opposed to a suggestion.”

Correction: An earlier version of this story used an incorrect number from the Washington State Hospital Association for daily COVID deaths in Washington. The association has since corrected the number to six to seven deaths per day.

Elise Takahama: 206-464-2241 or [email protected]; on Twitter: @elisetakahama.

How 'Shrinkflation' Is Affecting WA Grocery Lists Amid High Prices

Washingtonians are paying more for less, in some cases, amid the highest rates of inflation in 40 years.WASHINGTON — If you've noticed fewer chips for the family to dip after a trip to grocery stores in Puget Sound, you're not alone. Welcome to "shrinkflation," which allows manufacturers to raise prices on the sly by making packages and servings smaller.The cost of many of those items...

Washingtonians are paying more for less, in some cases, amid the highest rates of inflation in 40 years.

WASHINGTON — If you've noticed fewer chips for the family to dip after a trip to grocery stores in Puget Sound, you're not alone. Welcome to "shrinkflation," which allows manufacturers to raise prices on the sly by making packages and servings smaller.

The cost of many of those items manufacturers are downsizing is already increasing under the highest inflation in 40 years. According to the April Consumer Price Index data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the inflation rate in the Seattle region for the year ending April 30 was 9.1 percent. CPI data for May 2021 to 2022 will be released Friday.

So, you're already paying more to eat at home. Food costs in Washington increased 13.4 percent from April 2021 to April 2022.

Now consider the findings of Edgar Dworsky, a consumer advocate and former assistant attorney general in Massachusetts who has documented shrinkflation on his Consumer World website for decades.

Shrinkflation is nothing new and has been used in the past by manufacturers worldwide to avoid obviously passing on to customers the increased ingredient and supply costs that come with inflation. It doesn't just apply to food, either. For example:

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Dworsky told The Associated Press that shrinkflation is cyclical and "comes in waves."

"We happen to be in a tidal wave at the moment because of inflation," he said.

It can happen, but Dworsky doubts manufacturers will return to bigger packaging as inflation eases because consumers will have adjusted.

"Upsizing is kind of rare," he told the AP.

Hitendra Chaturvedi, a professor of supply chain management at Arizona State University's W.P. Carey School of Business, told the AP it's clear companies are struggling with labor shortages and higher raw material costs, but he's also troubled by an exponential rise in some companies' profits.

For example, PepsiCo's operating profit climbed 11 percent in 2021 and 128 percent in the first quarter.

"I'm not saying they're profiteering, but it smells like it," Chaturvedi told the AP. "Are we using supply constraints as a weapon to make more money?"

The Associated Press contributed reporting.

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Washington AG Sues Online Course For 'Deceptive' Marketing

The course promised to "guarantee" students a $60k+ job offer, a promise it absolutely could not keep. SEATTLE — Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson has filed a lawsuit against a South Carolina tech sales program, alleging that the company used deceptive marketing practices to scam Washingtonians out of tens of thousands of dollars.The company, Prehired LLC, offered an online training program for $30,000 which promised to help students land a lucrative career in tech. It's marketing even included that pro...

The course promised to "guarantee" students a $60k+ job offer, a promise it absolutely could not keep.

SEATTLE — Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson has filed a lawsuit against a South Carolina tech sales program, alleging that the company used deceptive marketing practices to scam Washingtonians out of tens of thousands of dollars.

The company, Prehired LLC, offered an online training program for $30,000 which promised to help students land a lucrative career in tech. It's marketing even included that promise, saying "We guarantee you land a $60k+ job offer (from a tech company YOU choose)."

That's a steep guarantee, and one that the company couldn't keep, Ferguson said. Not only did many applicants not secure high-paying tech jobs, but they were then subject to "aggressive collection techniques" from Prehired, which used lawsuits and forced arbitration to gather tuition fees.

"The company claims 90 percent of its students find employment, but it does not disclose that students have to apply to 20 or more jobs a week until they find employment as part of the program or risk voiding the job guarantee," the Attorney General's Office (AGO) said in a news release. "Nor does that total include any students who left the program early or Prehired removed from it, which allowed the company to keep that percentage artificially high."

Ferguson's office filed its suit against Prehired and owner Joshua Jordan in King County Superior Court this week. The suit accuses them of violating the state's Consumer Protection Act through false advertising, and of operating a private vocational school in the state without a license, which should have made contracts for payment unenforceable.

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"Washingtonians forked over tens of thousands of dollars in hard-earned money based on Joshua Jordan's lies," Ferguson said. "I intend to make sure Jordan and his company do not prey on anyone else. I will fight to see his victims paid back and help get them out from under these illegal contracts."

It's unclear exactly how many Washingtonians fell prey to Prehired, though the Attorney General's Office is aware of at least 39 who entered into payment contracts, and who collectively owe the company over $1 million. The AGO is asking that anyone else who was hurt by Prehired contact them by filing a complaint online. Ferguson's suit will be attempting to recoup the money, and force Prehired to pay $7,500 for every violation of the Consumer Protection act.

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Seattle’s population dropped, but another King County city saw fastest growth in WA

Seattle, the fastest-growing big city of the last decade, is now losing population.The Census Bureau released population data Thursday for all U.S. cities, towns and places. It shows that from July 1, 2020, to July 1, 2021, at the peak of the pandemic, Seattle had a net loss of nearly 4,300 people, which represents a decline of 0.6%.The city’s population now stands just shy of 734,000, and Seattle remains the 18th most-populous city in the nation. The last time Seattle’s population declined was between 2002 and 2003...

Seattle, the fastest-growing big city of the last decade, is now losing population.

The Census Bureau released population data Thursday for all U.S. cities, towns and places. It shows that from July 1, 2020, to July 1, 2021, at the peak of the pandemic, Seattle had a net loss of nearly 4,300 people, which represents a decline of 0.6%.

The city’s population now stands just shy of 734,000, and Seattle remains the 18th most-populous city in the nation. The last time Seattle’s population declined was between 2002 and 2003, when the city lost a modest 200 people.

It’s strange feeling for me to write about Seattle losing population. I’ve covered these Census Bureau releases in my column since 2013, when Seattle suddenly became the fastest-growing big city in the nation. For six consecutive years, Seattle ranked in the top 2 for the rate of growth. And in the 2019 to 2020 period, before the effects of the pandemic were captured in the data, Seattle was No. 1 again.

Even so, I was sure this news was coming. In March, the Census Bureau released population figures for U.S. counties, and it showed that King County had its first population decline in nearly 50 years. The county lost around 20,000 people from July 1, 2020, to July 1, 2021, but the data didn’t tell us how much of the loss came from Seattle. Now, with this new data release, we know it was about 4,300.

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The new Census Bureau release doesn’t include any data on what caused population changes, such as changes in domestic and international migration, or in the number of births and deaths. But we do have that information for each county, and it shows that more people left King County than moved in, and that migration from other countries greatly reduced from the pre-pandemic period. The number of births declined and the number of deaths increased, which was surely due in part to COVID-19.

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Seattle was hardly alone among major U.S. cities in losing population during this period. Even before the pandemic took hold, growth in many cities was slowing in recent years. In the period from 2019 to 2020, 15 of the largest U.S. cities lost population. The new data shows 32 shrank from 2020 to 2021.

Seattle’s drop in population was relatively small. Many of our “peer” cities had even larger declines, including Portland, Denver, Boston and Washington, D.C. And San Francisco was in a league of its own, losing an astonishing 6.4% of its population (a decline of close to 50,000 people). New York had the biggest numeric loss at 305,000.

The big city with the fastest growth was Fort Worth, at 1.4%. Another Texas city, San Antonio, had the largest numeric growth, increasing by about 13,600.

Not including Seattle, King County shrank by a little more than 1% — nearly twice Seattle’s rate of 0.6%. Indeed, a number of King County cities had significant declines in population last year. Bellevue shrank by about 2,400, a loss of 1.6%. Kent, Federal Way and Renton all had population losses of more than 1,500.

Even so, the state’s fastest-growing city, among those with at least 50,000 people, was also in King County.

Redmond increased its population by about 2,900, an impressive 4% growth rate. Microsoft’s hometown has been among the fastest-growing cities in the state for several years. In fact, in 2019, Redmond ranked as the 10th-fastest-growing city in the nation, among those with at least 50,000 people. In the new data, Redmond’s ranked 25th in the nation.

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Among Washington’s small cities and towns, the fastest growing was also in King County. Black Diamond, about 30 miles southeast of Seattle, grew by 20% in 2021, an increase of nearly 1,000 people. Black Diamond is home to a large new master-planned community called Ten Trails, which is being built in phases. This community, which opened in 2018, will eventually include roughly 6,000 homes, bringing more than 15,000 people to Black Diamond.

The other larger cities in Seattle’s metro area, Tacoma and Everett, both had small population declines.

Elsewhere in Washington, the larger cities of Spokane and Vancouver had modest growth. Spokane Valley grew by a healthy 2%, and in doing so surpassed Renton as the eighth-most-populous city in Washington.

Just as Seattle is perennially Washington’s biggest city, the state’s smallest town also has no real competition. The population of Krupp in Grant County was 47 last year, unchanged from 2020.

Gene Balk / FYI Guy: [email protected]; on Twitter: @genebalk.

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