Franchise Opportunities in Tucson, AZ

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Baby Boomers and The Need for An Independent Lifestyle

Statistics show that most baby boomers have a strong desire to remain independent as they age. These hardworking Americans are turning their noses up at the idea of spending their golden years in a strange nursing home. They have an unshakeable yearning to live life at home as long as possible. This factor, combined with advances in modern medicine that are helping seniors live longer, has set the stage for more home care franchise opportunities than ever before.

Millions of Americans Need Home Care Right Now

Research by the University of Alabama shows that more than seven million people in the U.S. need some form of home care. This fact is bolstered by the rising trend of "aging in place." Seniors not only want to be self-sufficient - they wish to remain at home, where the surroundings are familiar and family is near. Always Best Care nurtures this need by providing quality in-home care that helps both the seniors in need and their families.

When you implement Always Best Care's proven business model, your senior care franchise in Tucson, AZ will become a pillar in your community. You will be part of a highly regarded, reputable organization that others will respect. While you refine your reputation and earn respect, you'll be living an entrepreneurial lifestyle that lets you make a difference in other people's lives.

Recession Resistant, Essential, and Rewarding

Great entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for recession-resistant franchising opportunities. In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic, in-home care is now an essential service -- one that will continue to be needed, regardless of the economy. No matter what hurdles we must overcome, one thing is for sure: people will always need care.

At Always Best Care, our proven franchise model enables hundreds of dedicated franchisees the opportunity to achieve financial freedom in the most uncertain times. Our award-winning training program provides franchisees with the tools to succeed and the stability they need.

Always Best Care is one of the fastest-growing senior care franchise systems because our franchisees are more than just business owners, they are compassionate professionals dedicated to helping others. Perhaps most importantly, their home care business lets them care for people in their community while building a rewarding business for themselves.

Corporate-support

Corporate Support

Our experienced corporate team works with new in-home care franchise owners to provide comprehensive training for you and your staff, marketing resources, performance metrics, turnkey operating tech, systemwide benchmarking, national accounts, and customer satisfaction support.

Local-suppor

Local Support

Your local Area Representative and our National Directors work with all new franchisees to arrange mentoring opportunities, communications and team-building strategies, and ongoing strategic planning. That way, you have a leg up in your market and access to key resources to build your confidence as you develop your business.

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Assistance with State Licensing

Your Always Best Care franchise development specialist will make sure you have contact information in your state to complete any state licensure requirements. We link you to the nation's top health care licensure consultants, thus allowing you to discover the most cost-effective and time-efficient procedures to get your license, launch your business, and begin serving your community.

Exclusive-protected-territories

Exclusive, Protected Territories

Each Always Best Care franchise territory is protected and exclusive to you using zip codes in your state.

Our powerful combination of corporate and local support paves a clear and proven path for new Always Best Care franchise owners to succeed. And with your initial training, field training, and ongoing support, you always have access to Always Best Care repesentatives as you grow your senior home care business.

Get Started on Your Journey

If you have made it this far, it's now time to learn more about Always Best Care and the enriching opportunity that lies ahead. If you are ready to turn your dreams of living an entrepreneurial lifestyle into reality, you're closer than ever before. By downloading our free E-Book , you're taking the exciting next steps towards building a home care business that makes a true difference in your community.

Learn More About this Opportunity

Latest News in Tucson, AZ

Vertical Street Ventures and Partners Acquire New Tucson Property

TUCSON, Ariz., June 9, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Vertical Street Ventures (VSV) announced the acquisition of their fifth property in Tucson, Arizona. The acquisition marks the company's 21st transaction in the Western United States, bringing the total VSV portfolio to $270 Million in assets under management. Continue Reading The 114-unit ap...

TUCSON, Ariz., June 9, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Vertical Street Ventures (VSV) announced the acquisition of their fifth property in Tucson, Arizona. The acquisition marks the company's 21st transaction in the Western United States, bringing the total VSV portfolio to $270 Million in assets under management.

Continue Reading

The 114-unit apartment complex, which will be rebranded to Vertical North, features community amenities including two swimming pools, a clubhouse, and playground. VSV will invest over $1.8 Million into the property to add washers and dryers to renovated units, upgrade to new modern interiors including new kitchens and bathrooms, add new paint, landscaping and parking lot improvements and construction of a new outdoor gym.

"We are thrilled to acquire this wonderful property spanning a city block in North Tucson," said Kyle Mitchell, a Managing Partner for VSV. "We appreciate how well the property has been kept up and improved recently. As owners of several other properties in the area, this property has all the aspects you want to see with wonderful resident amenities and a great community feel. There's still a lot of room for growth and we look forward to serving these residents."

The transaction took place in partnership with Peter Pomeroy and Jon Faller of Northlight Growth Properties, Ral West and John Hardwick of Hardwick Apartment Homes, and Brett Moulton of Brojan Capital. The process was overseen by IPA's Hamid Panahi and Clint Wadlund. The property's loan was provided by Arbor's Eric Regenbogen with support from Meridian's Scott Rosenstock and Barry Lefkowitz. MEB Management Services Inc. will manage the property for VSV.

VSV's Tucson portfolio totals 588 units within a 12-mile radius. With low supply in the market, VSV will continue to improve current communities and create safe environments for Tucson residents.

About Vertical Street Ventures

Vertical Street Ventures (also known as VSV) is a commercial real estate private equity firm, led by Managing Partners Steven Louie, Jenny Gou, Kyle Mitchell, and Ronnie Gou. With a mission to improve communities nationally, VSV has grown substantially in the last year, growing its current portfolio of assets to $214 Million this year across the Arizona and Texas markets. VSV helps busy professionals build passive income through investing in real estate syndications.

Learn more at https://www.verticalstreetventures.com

Or contact [email protected]

About Northlight Growth Properties

Northlight Growth Properties ("NGP") is a San Francisco based real estate investment firm that specializes in the acquisition, repositioning, and management of value-add multifamily properties. Led by Peter Pomeroy and Jon Faller, the firm maximizes investor return through operational and physical improvements learned over a combined 40 years of real estate experience.

Learn More at https://www.northlightgrowth.com

Contact [email protected]

About Hardwick Apartment Homes

Hardwick Apartment Homes LLC (HAH) was created in 2021 for the purpose of investing in and syndicating multi-family properties in key markets in the US. Founded by Ral West and John Hardwick, HAH has embraced the amazing growth opportunities in the multi-family space, as well as the ability to help our own family and others achieve financial independence and build family wealth legacies for the long term. HAH is focused on key markets in the Sun Belt states, such as Texas, Oklahoma, Arizona, Florida, and Georgia. So far, HAH has invested in over 4100 units across these 5 states, as both Limited Partners and co-General Partners.

Media Contact Ronnie Gou (657) 366-1770 [email protected]

SOURCE Vertical Street Ventures

Arizona's Tommy Lloyd likely to become Pac-12's second-highest paid coach

Arizona’s Tommy Lloyd will likely become the Pac-12's second-highest paid basketball coach, behind only UCLA’s Mick Cronin, if his revised five-year deal is approved by the Arizona Board of Regents on Thursday in Flagstaff.UA ...

Arizona’s Tommy Lloyd will likely become the Pac-12's second-highest paid basketball coach, behind only UCLA’s Mick Cronin, if his revised five-year deal is approved by the Arizona Board of Regents on Thursday in Flagstaff.

UA filed a proposal last week to give Lloyd a $1 million raise to $3.6 million in total school-paid compensation for the 2022-23 season. Lloyd also receives about $200,000 each from Nike and IMG, for a guaranteed total of about $4 million. That figure is just shy of the $4.1 million Cronin is scheduled to receive at UCLA next season under a revised deal that was approved in March.

Oregon’s Dana Altman would become the Pac-12’s third-highest paid coach next season, receiving $3.775 million that is all school-paid next season, while USC’s Andy Enfield could also be among the league's top-compensated coaches. As private schools, USC and Stanford do not have to disclose their coaches' salaries. But USC's tax filing said it paid Enfield $3.29 million in fiscal 2020, and USA Today listed his 2021-22 salary at $3.35 million. Enfield signed a two-year extension in March that will run through the 2027-28 season; the Los Angeles Times said he received a raise, though terms have not been disclosed.

Lloyd’s proposed $4 million sum for 2022-23 would have ranked just outside the Top 10 nationally last season, according to USA Today’s college basketball coaching salary database.

Receiving Pac-12 and several national coach of the year honors last season after taking over for the fired Sean Miller in April 2021, Lloyd led the Wildcats well beyond expectations in what was his first season as a head coach. The Wildcats went 33-4, won the Pac-12 regular-season and tournament titles, then earned a No. 1 NCAA Tournament seed.

In UA's proposal to the Regents, the school said it wanted to rework Lloyd’s contract after his “overwhelmingly successful” first season, while also stiffening up a buyout provision intended to lock the coach in. Lloyd will have to pay UA $12 million if he opts to leave within the first two years of the deal, up from a $5 million buyout if he had left in the first two years of his previous deal.

Lloyd will have to pay $6 million if he leaves in the third year of the contract, and $2 million if in the fourth, fifth or in any additional years that might be given to him if NCAA sanctions hit the program.

“This modification of financial terms demonstrates Lloyd’s and UArizona’s commitment to each other and commitment to the success of the men’s basketball program,” UA’s proposal to the Regents said.

As with his initial contract, which had the same terms as Miller’s final contract, Lloyd is also scheduled to receive $100,000 salary escalators every season. That means he’ll earn school-paid package of $3.7 million in 2023-24 up to $4.0 million in the final season of 2026-27, plus the Nike and IMG income.

UA continues to say it will propose a sixth year for Lloyd if NCAA sanctions stemming from actions before his arrival result in a postseason ban, the loss of two or more scholarships or other “material restrictions” in recruiting for a year.Under the new proposal, a sixth year now would come with a school-paid package of $4.1 million. UA said a second extra contract year at $4.2 million would be proposed if the sanctions are handed down for more than one year.

• Departed super senior guard Justin Kier worked out Wednesday for the Washington Wizards. A native of Grottoes, Virginia, who also played at George Mason and Georgia, Kier posted a picture of Wizards gear he obtained from the workout.

• Former UA wing Bennedict Mathurin was projected to go No. 7 in the NBA Draft to Portland, according to a consensus mock draft compiled by NBA.com.

Arizona monsoon season: Here's when to expect those summer storms

Summertime in Arizona comes with some of the hottest temperatures in the country with highs reaching up to 118 degrees, such as what happened last June. The dry heat of the summer is followed by the relief of rain during the monsoon.Communities across Arizona cherish and relish the aromas of the monsoon that precede the intense thunderstorms and flash flood warnings.Here is what you need to...

Summertime in Arizona comes with some of the hottest temperatures in the country with highs reaching up to 118 degrees, such as what happened last June. The dry heat of the summer is followed by the relief of rain during the monsoon.

Communities across Arizona cherish and relish the aromas of the monsoon that precede the intense thunderstorms and flash flood warnings.

Here is what you need to know about the monsoon in Arizona.

What is the definition of monsoon?

The word monsoon comes from the Arabic word “mausim,” which means season. This is a fitting way to describe the period when rainstorms are more prevalent in the desert.

"A monsoon is a large-scale change in overall weather pattern," explained Marvin Percha, meteorologist at the National Weather Service.

A couple of factors are at play in order to create the kind of conditions for rain. The two big ones are the direction of the wind and moisture and daytime heating.

A shift in wind direction from the south to the southeast occurs in the summer. The moisture from the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico creates streams to the north. Combine this with the heat from the day in Arizona, which creates rising air or low pressure, and the conditions are set for monsoon storms.

These storms are really important as water is a scarce resource in the Southwest. The weather service approximates "40 to 50 percent of the annual precipitation falls during monsoon season."

When is Arizona's monsoon?

The Arizona monsoon season starts approximately in June and continues through September. Since 2008, the established dates from the National Weather Service are from June 15 through Sept. 30.

These dates only suggest the higher possibility of storms, so don't be confused when it doesn't rain between these dates.

Before the weather service established these dates, the start of the season was signaled by three consecutive days of average dew point temperatures of 55 degrees or higher. The dew point means the temperature to which air must be cooled to become saturated with water vapor. This is what forms clouds.

How much rain did Arizona get during the 2021 monsoon?

Last year's monsoon was the 20th wettest on record for Arizona. The average rainfall during the monsoon months was 7.93 inches. Most of this rainfall occurred in the mountainous regions of the state.

In an interview with The Arizona Republic, Michael Crimmins, a climate science researcher and extension specialist at the University of Arizona, said, "This particular monsoon hit Tucson and Phoenix really hard, which is where most of the people live in the state."

What are the predictions for the monsoon in 2022?

This year, the National Weather Service predicts that Arizona will have a very active monsoon.

In Phoenix, the chances of precipitation are approximately 70%, which is above normal across the Southwest.

What happens during a monsoon?

This desert weather phenomenon can look very differently in an urban environment such as Phoenix, compared with the saguaro-dense hills of the Sonoran Desert.

According to the weather service in Phoenix, high pressure in the atmosphere over northern Mexico strengthens and drifts northward during the summer months, which causes a reversal in the weather pattern across the Southwest.

While storms typically move from west to east in the spring, storms will move from east to west in the summer.

This flow then causes high levels of moisture to gather in the atmosphere across the desert landscape as tropical air moves north, according to the weather service.

With the combination of summer heat and moisture, conditions are more likely to become more favorable for periodic rain showers and thunderstorms.

Typically, the month of July is the rainiest of the year in Phoenix. About 1 to 1.05 inches of rain is expected. That's preceded by the driest month of the monsoon, June, which has an average rainfall of 0.02 inches.

How do residents prepare for monsoons?

Phoenix has put together a website with resources for people to help prepare for the monsoon.

Tips from the site:

Have a question you need answered? Let us know by filling out this form. Reach the reporter at [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter @raphaeldelag.

Republic reporter Haleigh Kochanski contributed to this article.

Pac-12 Hotline: UNC remains on top, Arizona falls in men's college hoops projections

The cyclone that walloped college basketball rosters this spring has lost much of its force, allowing us to peer into the future with reasonable clarity.The NBA Draft deadline has passed, the transfer portal is emptying, and we have a strong sense for the teams to beat in 2022-23.For some schools, the outlook has changed little from early April.For others, the clouds either have brightened immeasurable (Gonzaga and Kansas) or darkened considerably (Arizona and Michigan).The following rankings have been updated fro...

The cyclone that walloped college basketball rosters this spring has lost much of its force, allowing us to peer into the future with reasonable clarity.

The NBA Draft deadline has passed, the transfer portal is emptying, and we have a strong sense for the teams to beat in 2022-23.

For some schools, the outlook has changed little from early April.

For others, the clouds either have brightened immeasurable (Gonzaga and Kansas) or darkened considerably (Arizona and Michigan).

The following rankings have been updated from the originals, published by the Hotline on April 4.

1. North Carolina (previous: 1): The national runners-up secured this spot when star guard Caleb Love and forward Armando Bacot opted to return, leaving the Tar Heels with only one significant departure: forward Brady Manek. Plus, we have a soft spot for any team with guys named Leaky and Puff.

2. Gonzaga (8): The most significant change to our top 10 comes as a result of big man Drew Timme and wing Julian Strawther returning. (We figured the Zags might get one back, but not both.) Mark Few has enough options to replace point guard Andrew Nembhard that the position isn’t a major concern, yet.

3. Houston (4): The Cougars lost four double-digit scorers but return three double-digit scorers. How is that possible? The Elite Eight lineup was without two of its best players, guards Marcus Sasser and Tramon Mark, who were injured early in the season. They’re back, along with point guard Jamal Shead.

4. Duke (5): The best way to replace a slew of first-round draft picks is with a returning point guard (Jeremy Roach) and a slew of future first-round picks. The top-ranked recruiting class in the country features four players with five-star ratings. And for readers who were cryogenically frozen until recently: Duke has a new coach (Jon Scheyer).

5. Kentucky (2): With Wooden Award-winning big man Oscar Tshiebwe eschewing the NBA and two five-star recruits joining the roster, the Wildcats have enough talent to produce a deep run in the NCAAs … as long as John Calipari doesn’t coach against Shaheen Holloway in the early rounds.

6. Arkansas (7): A sensational recruiting class — it includes the nation’s No. 1 guard, Nick Smith — and excellent use of the transfer portal should fuel another impressive season for the Hogs under fourth-year coach Eric Musselman, who owns back-to-back trips to the Elite Eight.

7. Kansas (13): The defending champions were hit hard by departures, but their outlook improved with the return of forward Jalen Wilson and the addition of former Texas Tech guard Kevin McCullar, who reportedly picked KU over Gonzaga during his time in the portal.

8. Creighton (12): The Bluejays were a year ahead of schedule last season with 23 wins and a senior-light roster. Their spot in our top 10 was solidified when the trio of Ryan Kalkbrenner, Ryan Nembhard and Arthur Kaluma (35 points per game, combined) opted to return.

9. UCLA (6): Although it could have been worse, the attrition in Westwood was nonetheless substantial with Johnny Juzang and Jules Bernard staying in the draft. The degree to which UCLA mitigates the damage depends largely on freshman guard Amari Bailey and rookie big man Adem Bona.

10. Baylor (14): Veterans Adam Flagler and LJ Cryer will team with top-10 recruit Keyonte George to form one of the best perimeter units in the country. And since March is all about the perimeter, count the Bears as a threat to return to the Final Four.

11. Tennessee (18): The Vols lost point guard Kennedy Chandler to the NBA, as expected, but were an offseason winner (relative to other teams in our rankings) with the returns of their No. 2 and 3 scorers, guards Santiago Vescovi and Josiah-Jordan Jameson.

12. Texas (21): We suspected the Longhorns would bring back top scorers Timmy Allen and Marcus Carr. But the offseason value-add came in the form of point guard Tyrese Hunter, a transfer from Iowa State who was named Big 12 Freshman of the Year last season.

13. Michigan (3): Few teams can match Michigan’s level of attrition and no team dropped so far in our rankings. The Wolverines will have a new supporting cast around star big man Hunter Dickinson.

14. Oregon (17): The Ducks jumped a few spots thanks to the return of point guard Will Richardson and a group of newcomers that includes both premium recruits and impact transfers (for example: guard Jermaine Couisnard, who led South Carolina in scoring). Look for Oregon to return to the NCAAs after an unexpected absence.

15. Alabama (10): Basketball recruiting is beginning to mirror football recruiting in Tuscaloosa, with two five-star prospects joining coach Nate Oats’ program. But the shape of the regular season will depend on the speed of guard Jahvon Quinerly’s ACL recovery.

16. TCU (not ranked): The team that pushed Arizona to the brink in the second round of the NCAAs has far more returning production than Arizona.

17. USC (not ranked): We were skeptical of USC’s prospects until the final days before the NBA stay-or-go deadline, when two starters, guard Boogie Ellis and wing Drew Peterson, decided to stay. Count the Trojans as a legitimate contender in the Pac-12.

18. Villanova (9): Not much has changed for the Wildcats since our early-April rankings except, well, everything. Year One of the post-Jay Wright era could be bumpy.

19. Indiana (not ranked): Once big man Trayce Jackson-Davis announced his return (in mid-May), the Hoosiers became a lock for top-25 inclusion. And they just might be the best team in a potentially deflated Big Ten.

20. Arizona (11): The departures of star wing Bennedict Mathurin and dominant center Christian Koloko staggered the roster; the gut punch came just prior to the deadline when do-everything wing Dalen Terry stayed in the draft. We suspect Tommy Lloyd isn’t finished his spring restocking process.

21. Auburn (not ranked): The Hotline underestimated the Tigers last season and won’t make the same mistake in 2022-23 even with the departures of stellar big men Jabari Smith and Walker Kessler.

22. Saint Louis (not ranked): We like the Billikens to win the Atlantic 10 with all their returning veterans from a 23-win season. But the conference is wide open with Davidson, Dayton and St. Bonaventure all carrying top-25 potential.

23. San Diego State (23): The Aztecs’ presence in our rankings was secured when senior guard Matt Bradley (17 ppg) announced his return. Meet the best team in the Mountain West (unless it’s Wyoming, or Boise State, or Colorado State).

24. Virginia (25): The Cavaliers haven’t missed the NCAAs in back-to-back seasons since the early years of Tony Bennett’s tenure. His best recruiting class, which includes three four-star prospects, will power the recovery.

25. Connecticut (not ranked): Danny Hurley has a cornerstone piece in forward Adama Sanogo and a slew of impact transfers to create a high ceiling for the Huskies.

Also considered: Boise State, Colorado State, Davidson, Dayton, Illinois, Iowa, Memphis, Miami, Michigan State, New Mexico State, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Providence, Purdue, Saint Mary’s, Seton Hall, Texas A&M, Texas Tech, Wake Forest, Wyoming, Xavier

Native music project aims to help Az tribal members with Alzheimer's disease

Arts & EntertainmentAlzheimer's patients and caregivers in Arizona's tribal communities may find help with living with cognitive issues in a new musical project meant to help sooth emotions and stimulate memories — a CD of recordings by Native American music legend R. Carlos Nakai and others."Walk With Me" is a compilation of songs, including those by Nakai, the Grammy-nominated flutist of Navajo and Ute descent. On the album, he's joined by frequent collaborator Cliff Sarde, with other songs performed by ...

Arts & Entertainment

Alzheimer's patients and caregivers in Arizona's tribal communities may find help with living with cognitive issues in a new musical project meant to help sooth emotions and stimulate memories — a CD of recordings by Native American music legend R. Carlos Nakai and others.

"Walk With Me" is a compilation of songs, including those by Nakai, the Grammy-nominated flutist of Navajo and Ute descent. On the album, he's joined by frequent collaborator Cliff Sarde, with other songs performed by Sharon Burch, Aaron White, Kelvin Bizahaloni, and Robert Tree Cody also featured.

Music allows for connections without using words, experts said.

Banner Health's Alzheimer's Institute collaborated with Canyon Records and Sunshine Music Therapy to create the record for Arizona's tribal members living with the type of dementia that affects memory, thinking, and behavior. Native Americans have a higher chance of developing Alzheimer's or dementia compared to whites or Asian Americans, according to the Alzheimer's Association. But, Native patients often don't have access to the care and resources they need, and many go undiagnosed.

Music can help people with Alzheimer's disease reminisce, said Heather Mudler and Nicole Lomay, spokeswomen for the Alzheimer's Institute. Lomay, who also leads the institute's Native American Outreach Program, said because music is a key part of Native American traditions, Native patients listening to the CD will be able to remember aspects of their youth. This can also help with soothing emotions and offering behavioral support.

"Music can help with communication," Mudler said. "There comes a time when a lot of words can be too much to understand. So, music gives patients a way to connect without using verbal communication."

The first song is "Winter Camp," one of Nakai's most well-known compositions, which features Grammy-nominated composer and jazz multi-instrumentalist Cliff Sarde on keyboards with Nakai, who plays Native American flute and eagle bone whistle. Nakai has released over 50 albums in his recording career, has been nominated for Grammy awards 11 times and won an Arizona Governor's Arts Award.

Navajo and German folk singer-songwriter Sharon Burch has had three albums released by Canyon Records. She won the Indie Grammy for Best Native American Recording in 1996. On this CD, she plays acoustic guitar and sings on "We Are Here" along with William Eaton on synth guitar and bass, and Will Clipman on Taos drums and rattle.

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Aaron White — who is Ute and Dine — is a Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter who plays guitar on "Road Less Traveled" and Native flute on "I Bring the Moon and the Stars."

Canyon Records, an Arizona label the focuses on Native American artists such as Nakai, hopes the music will increase the quality of life for the patients and their caregivers who receive it, said Kathy Norris-Wilhelm, the company's promotions director.

"In the Native American community, music is an integral part of daily life, traditions, important ceremonies and celebrations," she said.

Norris-Wilhelm experienced what it is like to be a caregiver and loved one of a person living with Alzheimer's. Her wife passed away from early-onset Alzheimer's disease, and Norris-Wilhelm said she witnessed first-hand the benefits people with the disease receive from music.

"[Hearing] is the last portion in your brain to be diminished," Norris-Wilhelm said. "Music is so powerful."

Mudler and Lomay are working on distributing the CD to Arizona's tribal communities, looking to work with groups and organizations such as the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona Inc.

"The reason why we didn't release this CD to the general public is because we want to make sure it gets to the people who really need it," Lomay said.

The CD "Walk With Me" has 12 tracks, and it is meant to be utilized as a guide. Caregivers can play the album in order to provide a routine for their patients as well as a moment of care for themselves.

Those interested may contact [email protected] for more information on how to obtain the CD.

Banner Health, which operates the Alzheimer's Institute, manages the largest network of hospitals in Arizona.

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Bianca Morales is TucsonSentinel.com’s Cultural Expression and Community Values reporter, and a Report for America corps member supported by readers like you.

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